Loading…
Agile2012 has ended

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Advancing [clear filter]
Monday, August 13
 

9:00am CDT

Get Over It! Stop Obsessing Over CMMI and Get On with Being Great!: Hillel Glazer
Incompatibilities between CMMI and agile have largely been due to misapplication of CMMI stemming from a narrow and misguided understanding of CMMI. This is exacerbated when CMMI is viewed as a compliance standard for defining heavyweight processes rather than an improvement model to increase performance. Isn't it about time the Agile community just moved on and stopped dwelling and obsessing over CMMI and its supposed incompatibilities with agile? Yeah, I said it, _supposed_. There is nothing in CMMI that demands incompatibilities with agile practices, values, or the principles behind the manifesto. Any incompatibilities are due to either how people have inappropriately wielded CMMI, abused agile, or both. Most information/presentations about successes and failures of CMMI (with or without agile) have largely done little more than highlight what various organizations managed to do to satisfy appraisals. However, this compliance-driven perspective leaves out critical information about what CMMI actually works, how the appraisal is actually conducted, and how to use CMMI for actual improvement rather than appraisal compliance. In fact, most information and presentations on the integration of CMMI and agile have done very little to stem the tidal surge of misinformation and "CMMI malpractice" about how to actually work with CMMI -- both for the benefits of improvement as well as for getting coveted ratings. CMMI is a model. Models are tools. Before using any tool, users need instructions -- or at least they need to know what the tool is for and whether or not they've got the right problem solved by the tool. This lively, interactive, micro-tutorial will lay plain what CMMI is and how it works so that implementation of the model is clear thereby laying the groundwork for both the benefits of CMMI as well as achieving desired appraisal results. Properly used, CMMI can actually help lean and agile teams learn about themselves, find weaknesses in the way they work, improve their effectiveness and increase their performance. The session will share what I've done with clients for 10+ years that results in these outcomes -- while also achieving CMMI ratings -- while remaining entirely faithful to agile values and principles. The learning outcomes will prepare teams to pursue CMMI effectively with "level ratings" as a by-product of actual performance increases.

Speakers

Monday August 13, 2012 9:00am - 12:30pm CDT
Dallas 6-7
  Enterprise Agile

1:30pm CDT

ACT: A Planning Tool for Agile Change Agents: Jutta Eckstein, James Shore
When an organization makes a real effort to be Agile, they set in motion a series of changes that ripple throughout the entire organization. The side-effects are often surprising, and dealing with them can be challenging. In this session, Jutta Eckstein, Diana Larsen, and James Shore will present their Agile Change and Transformation (ACT) planning model. This model gives change agents a way to plan and understand their Agile change efforts. It provides a way to understand the context of a transformation, choose which changes to focus on, and decide whether to take a deterministic or adaptive approach. The ACT planning model is new and experimental. It's funded in part by the Agile Alliance's "Supporting Agile Adoption" program. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to try the model and help develop it further.

Speakers
avatar for Jutta Eckstein

Jutta Eckstein

Independent Coach, consultant, trainer and speaker, IT Communications
Jutta Eckstein (http://jeckstein.com) is an independent coach, consultant and trainer from Braunschweig, Germany. Her know-how in agile processes is based on over twenty-five years’ experience in project and product development. Her focus is on enabling agile development on the... Read More →
avatar for James Shore

James Shore

Consultant, Titanium I.T. LLC
James Shore teaches, writes, and consults on Agile development processes. He is a recipient of the Agile Alliance's Gordon Pask Award for Contributions to Agile Practice, co-author of /The Art of Agile Development/, and co-creator of the Agile Fluency™ Model. You can find his essays... Read More →


Monday August 13, 2012 1:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Texas D

1:30pm CDT

Agile Inception Deck - 10 questions you'd be crazy not to ask before starting your project: Jonathan Rasmusson
Software is one of those unique activities that combine design, construction, art, and science all rolled up into one. Teams face thousands of decisions and trade-offs every day. And without the right context or big-picture understanding, it’s impossible to make the right trade-offs in an informed or balanced way. The agile inception deck is a lightweight project chartering tool that gives teams the **why** behind what they are doing. More than that it defines a common vision of success upfront, and makes sure everyone is aligned before the project begins.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/99-inception-deck.pdf



Monday August 13, 2012 1:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 5-6

1:30pm CDT

'The Big Picture': Agility and Strategic Vision: Jimi Fosdick
When organizations adopt an agile approach to development there is so much focus on the iterative nature of agile development that long range vision and strategic product design, "The Big Picture", can get lost. In this workshop, Certified Scrum Trainer and Agile Process Mentor, Jimi Fosdick, PMP, CST discusses the need to include long term product vision, coherent user experience and User Centered design and architecture along with specific best practices for achieving a coherent product that delights users and walks participants through hands on, game-based, exercises to achieve that goal. Topics will include: Discussion of Product Vision and hands-on experience crafting a compelling overall vision Discussion of User-Centered/Value-Driven design and hands-on exercises to incorporate user experience (UX) and software architecture early in the development process Explanation of the pitfalls of a lack of vision and so-called "hybrid" models for incorporating UX and architecture into agile projects including the exercise "How To Tell If Your Vision is Impaired"

Speakers

Monday August 13, 2012 1:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Texas 2
  Enterprise Agile

1:30pm CDT

Getting to the Next Level: Practicing Leadership Agility for Effective Agile Management: Bill Joiner, Michael Hamman
Sustaining and growing agile capability in large enterprises presents significant challenges for leaders. Underlying these challenges is the challenge of leadership itself. What does it mean to lead an agile organization? What manner of leadership does agility call for? In this hands-on workshop, we explore three “levels” of leadership agility, from the award-winning book, *Leadership Agility*. Going beyond previous conceptions of agile leadership, you will learn the rarely practiced “Catalyst” level of leadership agility, and think through how to apply its principles and practices to the larger challenges posed by today’s Agile initiatives.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile 2012 -- Leadership Agility Workshop Slides -- FINAL.pptx.pdf


Monday August 13, 2012 1:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Dallas 5
  Leadership

1:30pm CDT

The Fastest Learner Wins: Exploring the Innovator’s DNA: Mary Poppendieck, Tom Poppendieck
No matter how large and successful a company is today, it's long term survival is by no means guaranteed. Only a few large companies have been able to sustain growth over time by coming up with a steady stream of new disruptive businesses. How do they do it? Innovative companies create a climate in which cross functional teams conduct rapid, inexpensive experiments directly with customers. They foster the five innovation skills described in Clayton Christensen's book: The Innovator’s DNA - Observing, Questioning, Associating, Networking, and Experimenting. This Workshop is about using continuous feedback to speed up learning and radically improve the process of developing of software-intensive systems. It covers: 1. Continuous Delivery 2. Continuous Design 3. Continuous Experimentation 4. Continuous Progress Participants will explore questions such as: 1. Do our value streams bring together into a single network all of the capabilities necessary to create and deliver a compelling offer to customers? 2. Do team members understand who their customers are and why these customers will choose our product above all alternatives? 3. Does value flow from idea to delivery on a continuous basis and in a disciplined manner that delivers unassailable quality? 4. Are features validated against real customer behavior and modified based on whole system feedback? 5. Does everyone constantly challenge the status-quo and experiment with alternate ways of delivering even more compelling value to customers?
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Innovation.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Mary Poppendieck

Mary Poppendieck

Lean Software
Mary Poppendieck has been in the Information Technology industry for over forty years. She has managed software development, supply chain management, manufacturing operations, and new product development. She spearheaded the implementation of a Just-in-Time system in a 3M manufacturing... Read More →


Monday August 13, 2012 1:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Texas C
  User Experience
 
Tuesday, August 14
 

11:00am CDT

Software Change in the Solo Iterative Process: An Experience Report: Vaclav Rajlich, Chris Dorman
This paper reports an experience of a solo programmer who added a new feature into an open source program called muCommander. The process is observed on two granularities: Granularity of software change (SC) and granularity of Solo Iterative Process (SIP). The experience confirms that both SC and SIP process models can be successfully enacted, are able to implement the described feature, and produced a high quality code in reasonable time. The lessons learned, particularly the exit criteria for SC phases, are discussed in more detail in the paper.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Solo Iterative Process.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Vaclav  Rajlich

Vaclav Rajlich

Professor, Wayne State University
Vaclav Rajlich focuses his research on software development. His papers deal with staged model of software lifespan, Agile development, software change processes and techniques, and similar topics. He published book "Software engineering: The current practice", CRC Press, 2012. He... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 11:00am - 11:30am CDT
Ft. Worth 7
  Research at Work

11:30am CDT

Knowledge Management in Distributed Agile Software Development: Siva Dorairaj, , James Noble and Petra Malik
Software development teams need highly valuable knowledge to carry out knowledge-intensive development activities. Agile teams are cross-functional teams that promote sharing of project-specific knowledge through frequent face-to-face interaction, effective communication and customer collaboration. Knowledge sharing is difficult for distributed Agile teams due to spatial, temporal, and cultural barriers, which negatively affect face-to-face interaction, communication and collaboration. There seems to be very few studies that focus on knowledge management in distributed Agile teams. Through a Grounded Theory study that involved 45 participants from 28 different software companies in the USA, India and Australia, we investigate distributed software development from the specific perspective of Agile teams. In this paper, we describe how Agile teams gather, store, share and use knowledge in distributed software development.

Speakers
avatar for Siva Dorairaj

Siva Dorairaj

Teaching Fellow, Victoria University of Wellington
A PhD researcher from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Through a Grounded Theory study which involved 55 participants from 38 different software companies in the USA, India and Australia, I investigated key concerns of distributed teams in Agile software development... Read More →


Tuesday August 14, 2012 11:30am - 12:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7
  Research at Work

1:30pm CDT

A Methodology for Assessing Agile Software Development Methods: Shvetha Soundararajan, James Arthur
Agile methods provide an organization or a team with the flexibility to adopt a selected subset of principles and practices based on their culture, their values, and the types of systems that they develop. More specifically, every organization or team implements a customized agile method, tailored to better accommodate its needs. However, the extent to which a customized method supports the organizational objectives, i.e. the ‘goodness’ of that method, is questionable. Existing agile assessment approaches focus on comparative analyses, or are limited in scope and application. In this research, we propose a structured, systematic, and comprehensive approach to assessing the ‘goodness’ of agile methods. We examine an agile method based on (1) its adequacy, (2) the capability of the organization to support the adopted principles and practices specified by the method, and (3) the method’s effectiveness. We propose the Objectives, Principles and Practices (OPP) Framework to guide our assessment. The Framework identifies (1) objectives of the agile philosophy, (2) principles that support the objectives, (3) practices that are reflective of the principles, (4) linkages among the objectives, principles and practices, and (5) indicators for assessing the extent to which an organization supports the implementation and the effectiveness of that practice. In this paper, we discuss our solution approach, preliminary results, and future work.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/SoundararajanArthurBalci_Agile2012_Handout_v1.pdf

Speakers


Tuesday August 14, 2012 1:30pm - 2:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7
  Research at Work

1:30pm CDT

Agile and PMI: Barbarians at the Gate: Andrew Burns
How to react as stones fall on our Agile heads from lofty towers? Transcendence of Agile limitations in the quest for Enterprise Agility calls for a planned siege, not a mob. Make a blueprint in this session! Become masters of siege engines delivering customer value, not Barbarians at the Gate. The PMO and keepers of the corporate yearly planning cycle still cling to traditions of waste. The true need to optimize the whole is fog bound by mystic thinking. In revered enterprise Keeps, day is night. It is possible to know all the requirements at the start. Omniscient customers 'do know' what they want a year from now. Interim feedback is a waste of time and only generates scope creep. Interim milestones measure progress well enough. Demanding that work be done, delivers desired results. Complex program management software can squeeze 150% out of a person! Keepers of the enterprise ken know Agile is wrong. The status quo is correct. Affronts are hurled down on Agile teams. Self-organizing teams can never improve processes beyond the team. It is not feasible to deliver value to the customer every sprint. Agile teams can not plan beyond the current sprint. Scrum of Scrums is a failed theory to coordinate multiple teams. It just can’t scale. Agile sees no need for automated testing or up front unit testing. We need documentation!

Speakers
avatar for Andy Burns, PMP, PMI-ACP, of Siemens PLM

Andy Burns, PMP, PMI-ACP, of Siemens PLM

Siemens PLM, Chief Scrum Master
Andy Burns PMP, PMI-ACP is the Chief Scrum Master for Siemens PLM Software. Being a proud traditional project manager with agile capabilities in his skills portfolio, Andy now scales agile with several hundred software engineers around the world working in a mixed portfolio of agile... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Texas D

2:00pm CDT

Agile Testing: Past, Present, and Future: Theodore D. Hellmann, Abhishek Sharma,, Jennifer Ferreira and Frank Maurer
Testing has been a cornerstone of agile software development methodologies since early in the history of the field. However, the terminology used to describe the field – as well as the evidence in existing literature – is largely inconsistent. In order to better structure our understanding of the field and to guide future work, we conducted a systematic mapping of agile testing. We investigate five research questions: which authors are most active in agile testing; what is agile testing used for; what types of paper tend to be published in this field; how do practitioners and academics contribute to research in this field; and what tools are used to conduct agile testing? Of particular interest is our investigation into the source of these publications, which indicates that academics and practitioners focus on different types of publication and, disturbingly, that the number of practitioner papers in the sources we searched is strongly down since 2010.


Tuesday August 14, 2012 2:00pm - 2:30pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7
  Research at Work

2:30pm CDT

User Experience Design Goes Agile in Lean Transformation – A Case Study: Minna Isomursu, Petri Voltti,, Markku Halonen and Andey Sirotkin
This paper describes the results of a single-case case study, exploring the role of user experience (UX) work in agile software development. The case study company is a large multinational telecommunication company undergoing a lean transformation process. In this case, lean transformation includes the adoption of agile software development practices. Transformation to agile practices had taken place one year prior to the analysis. The analysis is based on documentation analysis and semi-structured interviews of seven software development professionals. The results show that there were difficulties integrating UX design and software engineering work in an agile and iterative manner. The transition process succeeded in shifting UX and related documentation to a central planning role. The roles of the UX designers in the teams were still under re-definition. There was also a clear need to establish new ways of collaboration between UX professionals and software designers.


Tuesday August 14, 2012 2:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7
  Research at Work

3:30pm CDT

Estimate of the appropriate iteration length in agile development by conducting simulation: Ryushi Shiohama, Hironori Washizaki, Shin Kuboaki,, Kazunori Sakamoto and Yoshiaki Fukazawa
"Agile development refers to the group of software development methodologies based on an iterative and incremental process model. It divides the development period into short time frames called iterations and uses a body of knowledge obtained from past experience called practice to ensure agile software development Although the iteration length is an important factor in agile development however it has so far been decided by the qualitatively and it has been reported that projects with an inappropriate iteration length are more preme to failure. We thus propose a new methodology for estimating an appropriate iteration length through the conduct on of a simulation based on project constraints. In this study we first, propose a method of calculating an appropriate iteration length for a particular project to promote the easy use of agile development. Second, the relationship between the iteration length and project constraints was investigated by varying the parameters to create diverse situations. "


Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 4:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7
  Research at Work

3:30pm CDT

Questions not Stories: Build a business-value oriented team: Adrian Howard
User Stories are a fantastic agile tool, but they are not the only way for the product owner and team to reach a mutual understanding of what needs to be delivered. This workshop explores the use of hypotheses and experiments from the Lean Startup community. We see how using hypotheses instead of stories brings advantages to the development team, the customer, and the user. Stop telling stories about your product - start asking questions.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/questions-not-stories-placeholder.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Adrian Howard

Adrian Howard

Quietstars
Adrian Howard is passionate about building effective teams and great products. He co-founded Quietstars to help organisations do that using Lean, Agile and User Experience practices. You'll find Adrian working with startup and product development teams — doing everything from... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 5-6

3:30pm CDT

Lean from the Trenches: Managing Large Scale Projects with Kanban & Scrum & XP: Henrik Kniberg
Find out how the Swedish police combined Kanban, Scrum, and XP in a 60-person project. This is a high-paced talk based almost entirely on photos, diagrams, and concrete examples. We’ll go beyond the basics and walk through the project step by step, from customer engagement, to the "daily cocktail party”, test, cross-team synchronization, multi-layer kanban boards, version control, metrics, and more. The project was finalist in the Swedish “Project of the Year” awards for 2011. We start with an organization in desperate need of a new way of doing things, and finish with cross-functional teams all working in sync to develop a scalable, complex system while continuously improving their development process.

Speakers
avatar for Henrik Kniberg

Henrik Kniberg

Agile Coach & Consultant, Crisp
Henrik Kniberg is a consultant at Crisp in Stockholm. He does Minecraft gameplay design, development and team coaching at Mojang, and has previously worked at Lego and Spotify.Henrik enjoys helping companies succeed with both the technical and human sides of product developmen... Read More →


Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Austin 1-3
  Enterprise Agile

3:30pm CDT

Creating a Shared Vision: Strategies and Techniques to Inspire Teams: Brad Swanson
Does your vision inspire your team to achieve greatness? Peter Senge describes the shared vision as one the core disciplines of the Learning Organization. In this interactive session, we will explore five strategies for creating a shared vision (for a product or an organization) to move people beyond mere compliance toward a true commitment to the vision. We will then use some concrete visioning techniques, from Innovation Games(R) and elsewhere, to create our own shared vision. You'll leave with a toolbox of strategies and techniques to build a shared vision that truly inspires your team.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Shared Vision.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Brad Swanson

Brad Swanson

Senior Agile Coach, agile42 LLC
Brad Swanson is a Senior Agile Coach and Vice President at agile42. He started his software career at age 10 on the Apple IIe and is now a Certified Scrum Trainer® (CST) and Coach (CSC) with 19 years of experience in management, project and program leadership, product management... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Austin 4-6
  Leadership

4:00pm CDT

Agile Development and User Experience Design Integration as an On-going Achievement in Pra: Jennifer Ferreira, Helen Sharp and Hugh Robinson
Little is known about how Agile developers and UX designers integrate their work on a day-to-day basis. While accounts in the literature attempt to integrate Agile development and UX design by combining their processes and tools, the contradicting claims found in the accounts complicate extracting advice from such accounts. This paper reports on three ethnographically-informed field studies of the day-to-day practice of developers and designers in organisational settings. Our results show that integration is achieved in practice through (1) mutual awareness, (2) expectations about acceptable behaviour, (3) negotiating progress and (4) engaging with each other. Successful integration relies on practices that support and maintain these four aspects in the day-to-day work of developers and designers.


Tuesday August 14, 2012 4:00pm - 4:30pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7
  Research at Work

4:30pm CDT

Documentation Work in Agile Teams: The Role of Documentation Formalism in Achieving a Sust: Christoph Johann Stettina, Werner Heijstek and Tor Erlend Fægri
As its second guiding principle, agile software development promotes working software over comprehensive documentation. In this paper we investigate alignment between two different documentation practices and agile development. We report upon an experiment conducted to explore the impact of formalism and media type on various dimensions of documentation practice in agile teams. 28 students in 8 teams were divided into two groups: SAD and UML. Group SAD was to update and deliver their high-level software architecture in form of a textual description defined by RUP templates. Group UML was instructed to update and deliver their low-level software design in form of UML models. Our results show that iterative documentation practices led to more extensive and more detailed textual documentation. We found that writing documentation was perceived as a intrusive task leading to task specialization and allocation of documentation to less qualified team members. Consequently, this hampered collaboration within the team. Based in our findings, we suggest that if documentation is to be delivered with the project, producing documentation should be communicated and accepted by the team as a proper product. Furthermore, we argue that codification of internal development knowledge should be a non-intrusive task.


Tuesday August 14, 2012 4:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7
  Research at Work
 
Wednesday, August 15
 

9:00am CDT

The Lean Pyramid - The Equilibrium of Agile Forces: Samuel Crescêncio
The Lean Pyramid presents a model to help companies start their agile adoption strategy effectively. Reliably delivering valuable working software frequently is much more than just creating, estimating and prioritizing a backlog and developing it iteratively. In order to succeed with agile you have to understand the needed equilibrium of forces among strategy, management and engineering efforts. Through a deep explanation of the fundamental Lean principles, you will learn how they translate to agile software development in order to create a strong and successful culture in your company.


Wednesday August 15, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Texas D

9:00am CDT

Cultural change with Spiral Dynamics to transform from 'doing agile' to 'being agile': Dajo Breddels
Agile software development is no longer the sole domain of little obscure IT companies with their own gurus. Even the most traditional companies are adopting agile methodologies. Finally, recognition! But alas it comes with some drawbacks. “Doing Agile” instead of “Being Agile” is one of those drawbacks I keep encountering more and more. Values don’t change overnight by just showing people the agile manifesto and sending them to a two day training. But how can you change the values of individuals and teams or even worse, whole organisations? That's what this session is about! Luckily, there is a thing called Spiral Dynamics and it’s all about: how people get certain values, why they defend them and how these values evolve over time. Spiral Dynamics is based on 30 years of research done by psychology professor Clare W. Graves. With the help of Spiral Dynamics we are going to: 1) Discover the different kinds of Agile implementations based on value systems. 2) Recognize them in our own teams and organisations. 3) Know how we can help teams and organisations move from “Doing Agile” to “Being Agile”.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Cultural change with Spiral Dynamics_A2012.pdf

Speakers


Wednesday August 15, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Ft. Worth 3-4
  Coaching & Mentoring

9:00am CDT

Scaling Lean|Agile Development to the Large Enterprise with the Scaled Agile Framework: Dean Leffingwell
The continuing knock on XP, Scrum and Kanban is that they may work well for small, collocated teams, but they do not scale to the needs of the larger software enterprise. In this presentation, Dean Leffingwell will finally dispel this myth by describing the Scaled Agile Framework™, a well-defined and publicly available set of practices which have been used to successfully scale Lean|Agile development to hundreds—and even thousands—of practitioners at companies like BMC Corporation, John Deere and many others. Results typically include quality and productivity improvements of from 20-50%, along with increases in employee engagement and job satisfaction. In this presentation, Leffingwell will describe how the three key Agile constructs — team, backlog and timebox— can be scaled to the program and portfolio levels of the enterprise. However, since simply making Agile things bigger does not necessarily keep a system lean, Leffingwell will describe how the framework a) keeps work in process visible and limited, b) keeps backlogs and queues short, c) uses cadence and synchronization to align teams to a common mission, and d) applies system-level continuous integration to facilitate fast customer feedback. The presentation also includes a description of kanban systems to manage the flow of the business and architectural epics that drive the agile programs. The presentation concludes with a discussion of how lean thinking executives are instrumental in helping the enterprise achieve the ultimate business benefits that these innovate processes can deliver.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile2012 rev4.pptx.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Dean Leffingwell

Dean Leffingwell

Chief Methodologist, Scaled Agile, Inc.



Wednesday August 15, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Texas C
  Enterprise Agile

1:30pm CDT

Combining Kanban and Scrum - lessons from the team of sysadmins: Kate Terlecka
Kanban is becoming a fashonable term in the Agile world. Is it really an answer to all of our problems? Join me in discovering how a team of sysadmins dragged the best of it, added a chunk of Scrum and came up with a clear and sustainable process for support teams. Then, let’s take a look at another team that successfully followed their example.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile2012 2.0.pdf

Speakers

Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 2:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7

1:30pm CDT

Patterns for Agile Adoption and Transformation: Mike Cottmeyer
Introducing agile into an organization is more than just running people through a few days of training and hoping for the best. Training is part of the equation but only addresses one part of the adoption and transformation cycle. The problem with a training-only approach is that we can learn new ways of working, but if the structure and culture of the organization don't support those new ways of working, the training won't stick. The trick is to create an organizational structure and culture that is congruent with training in agile practices. We need a structure and culture where Agile practices can flourish and grow and produce the business outcomes we all hope for. This talk will start by exploring the main differences between agile adoption and agile transformation and how to distinguish between structural transformation and cultural transformation. Next we'll explore criteria for how to assess your organization and create an adoption and transformation roadmap to help you pragmatically and safely introduce agile methods to your enterprise. Finally we'll explore three primary dimensions of adoption and transformation: competency, frequency, and scale that will assist in guiding your adoption and transformation roadmap and change management strategy. After establishing the theoretical underpinning of a successful adoption and transformation strategy, we'll consider several case studies where these ideas have been applied and what has worked, and more importantly, what hasn't. The case studies will consider 3-5 companies of varying sizes where these ideas have been applied in the past 18 months.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Cottmeyer

Mike Cottmeyer

CEO and Founder, LeadingAgile



Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Texas D

1:30pm CDT

Remote Pair Programming: A Guide for Distributed Teams: Joe Moore
*Remote pair programming* is surprisingly simple and inexpensive to implement, but it's not just about bleeding-edge technology -- a good attitude is just as important as good technology. Joe will walk you through how your distributed team can successfully implement remote pair programming, allowing you to realize the same benefits as in-person pairing and address some of the challenges of distributed development. Joe will discuss the important personal and interpersonal skills needed for remote pairing as well as the technology. Distributed agile teams need not forgo the valuable discipline of pair programming. Thanks to ubiquitous high speed internet service, major advances in online collaboration technologies, and the need to source talent wherever they might be, remote pair programming is becoming more common.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Remote Pair Programming - Conference 2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Moore

Joseph Moore

Principal Software Engineer, Manager, Pivotal
An XP purist since the year 2000, Joe has pair programmed almost 34,000 hours. Joe has been developing and advocating for distributed agile methodologies since going fully remote in 2010, such as remote pair programming, "everyone's remote" distributed team philosophies, and even... Read More →


Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Texas 2
  Distributed Agile

1:30pm CDT

Influencing Teams with Psychology: Charles Suscheck
Self directed agile teams often don't have hierarchical management. This session is about using psychological tools to influence team members who don't report to you. If you need to influence others, this workshop will give you the tools. Through examples, exercises, and practice targeted to selling agile concepts, you will apply Cialdini's psychological tools (reciprocity, scarcity, commitment consistency, authority, liking, and social proof) to craft persuasive positions.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Handout.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Chuck Suscheck

Chuck Suscheck

Professional Trainer, scrum.org
Dr. Charles Suscheck specializes in agile software development methodologies, and project management. He is one the few people in the world certified to teach the entire scrum.org curriculum. He has over 25 years of professional experience in information technology, beginning his... Read More →



Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 1-2
  Leadership

3:30pm CDT

Agile Portfolio Management at NYSE : Gabino Roche, Jr.
Sharing my experience in the financial industry as a Managing Director at NYSE Euronext, as well at other finance companies, in managing a business program by leveraging Agile. - **Introduction/Context** * My background and the world of finance & technologies - **Real examples of managing a portfolio by prioritizing against real business value** * Competing priorities * Revenue objectives and cost constraints * Planning a roadmap and managing opportunity costs * Prioritization against real business value whether internal business programs or client-facing deliverables * Road mapping and continuous re-planning * Validating annual stakeholder objectives - **Define the Product Owner role/team between the business and IT** * Product Owner roles between the business and IT * Typical corporate Agile evolution & adoption pains * Defining release visions and goals * Stakeholder engagement model * Adoption & Power-Users
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile Portfolio Management at NYSE.pdf


Wednesday August 15, 2012 3:30pm - 4:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7

3:30pm CDT

How to Brainstorm : Lessons from Design Thinking: Jeremy Lightsmith
Do you know how to come up with the next great idea? How about just a good idea? Turns out there is quite a lot of knowledge out there about just that. In this workshop, we'll take you from where you are today, to visit (and use!) several effective techniques for coming up with a plethora of ideas (which by the way, is how you do it). We'll finish by introducing the most important part of brainstorming, the inspiration you gather before you start.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/How to Brainstorm.pdf

Speakers
JL

Jeremy Lightsmith

Agile Coach / Facilitator, Lightsmith Consulting LLC



Wednesday August 15, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 5-6

3:30pm CDT

Meet Scrum’s Big Brother, Dynamic Governance. Effectively Delivering Large Programs: Dan LeFebvre, John Buck
Scrum works great with small, focused teams on small projects. What happens when you need to deliver a medium to large sized program that require more people? Scrum gives no guidance on scaling. There are books and ideas out there (“Scrum of Scrums”, Integration Scrum teams) but none have delivered reliable results. These techniques often reduce the sense of collaboration and agility as the programs get larger. Decisions feel more autocratic, teams have a lower sense of control and happiness. Dynamic Governance (see http://www.governancealive.com/dynamic-governance/) may provide the answer. Called by some “Scrum’s big brother”, Dynamic Governance is an organizational method that uniquely combines best business practices with the principles of cybernetics and systems thinking to deliver a decision-making mechanism that works at scale. Developed in The Netherlands, it has been used successfully in organizations for over 40 years. This workshop will demonstrate how Scrum is a Dynamic Governance system for 1 team. It suggests some improvements, particularly for retrospective meetings. However, the workshop will focus primarily on applying Agile philosophy and the 3 principles of Dynamic Governance to design organizations at different levels of scale, including top management and organizational units that are not directly involved in the production of software. Decisions are made quickly, are biased toward action, and stick.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Meet Scrum’s Big Brother, Dynamic Governance v3.pdf

Speakers
avatar for John Buck

John Buck

President, GovernanceAlive LLC
John Buck is the coauthor of the very recently published book Company-wide Agility with Beyond Budgeting, Open Space & Sociocracy, see http://www.agilebossanova.com/ and #agilebossanova. The second edition of his earlier book was also recently released We the People: Consenting to... Read More →
DL

Dan LeFebvre

Kronos Incorporated


Wednesday August 15, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 1-2
  Enterprise Agile
 
Thursday, August 16
 

9:00am CDT

Agile Values, Innovation and 
the Shortage of Women Software Developers: Ken Judy
Women are opting out of software development and leaving established software careers in disproportionate numbers. This is a material burden to the software industry and contributes to software that under-serves women as end users. Agile principles motivate practitioners to drive change into their organizations that support a humane, collaborative, empowered way of working. Organizations embracing these principles have potential to better attract and retain women (and men). As Agile practitioners should we and can we advocate for this outcome? Women represent 46% of the workplace and only 25% of software developers. Over two decades the percentage of women developers has steadily declined. 41% of women professionals leave established careers in high technology. Half leaving the sector completely. The number of women earning Computer Science bachelor’s degrees dropped 55% from 1986 to 1995 despite growing percentages of women graduating from four year colleges. And young women are significantly less interested in studying hard tech then men. Their absence costs the software industry and is an impediment to addressing a market where women are online in equal numbers to men; directly or indirectly influence 61% of consumer electronics purchases; generate 58% of online dollars; and represent 42% of active gamers. Women avoid careers in software development due to hostile environments, unsustainable pace, diminished purpose, disadvantages in pay, advancement, peers and mentors. Agile values steel practitioners for the hard work of confronting impediments, incrementally nudging an organization towards a more collegial, sustainable, creative and productive workplace so that the organization can repeatedly create software of value to stakeholders and of real use to people. These principles and the emergent properties they instill in organizations fight many of the dysfunctions research indicates contribute to women's flight from and avoidance of software careers. Through iterative cycles of knowledge creation and sharing within companies, across enterprises, into academic institutions and out to the media success within development teams can shift the larger culture. Agile adoption itself is an example of this. The result could be more human workplaces and a more social and engaged view of the software developer that will encourage girls to pursue computer science and help the industry recruit and retain larger numbers of talented women. The presenter is developer, manager and executive who has practiced Agile methods for nine years and eleven years working in Women run businesses in the Media industry in New York City.

Speakers

Thursday August 16, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Austin 4-6
  Leadership

9:00am CDT

Fixing Broke(n) Governments Through Serious Games: Luke Hohmann
It’s no secret. We’re broke. Local, state and federal governments around the world are all facing budget shortfalls, spending cuts and reduced services. All of us — ordinary citizens, elected officials, civic and community leaders — know that we must make dramatic changes to solve these crises, and yet governments remain gridlocked. How do we move beyond this impasse? How do we create an approach to budgeting that is both participatory and scalable? The answer lies in the serious games pioneered by the Agile Community. In this interactive lecture, participants will learn to conduct in-person and online games built specifically for resolving multi-dimensional budget problems. These games are based on games that have been played for years in the Agile Community. In this session, however, we'll demonstrate that by challenging our own definitions of leadership, we can demonstrate that practices common in many Agile teams can have a massive impact. We will detail the Budget Games played in San Jose, CA, on Jan. 29, 2011 and Jan 21, 2011. In both sessions more than 100 community leaders collaboratively re-crafted the city’s proposed budget. Because the games, which were graciously facilitated pro-bono by many members of the Agile Community, generated actionable consensus, San Jose officials were able to act on the game’s results with more confidence than traditional polling. In the workshop, participants will learn how to run a budget game in their own community and help refine both the in-person and online game prototypes. Brief overview of our process and results from January 2011 (the Jan 2012 games have not been completed): 1. The San Jose Mayor’s office created a list of 18 funding proposals that community leaders could purchase using the basic game structure of the Innovation Game® _Buy a Feature_. The total cost of these items was $14,000,000. The list of items that we used in this game can be found here: [funding proposals](http://innovationgames.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/fundingproposals.pdf). 2. Community leaders organized into groups of between 7 and 9 players, with 8 players / game as the most common configuration. Each player was given $200,000 to purchase items they wanted. This was a very constrained game, and Community leaders quickly determined that they couldn’t buy much. 3. The Mayor’s office created a second list of budget cuts that the Community leaders could select through unanimous agreement to get more money. This list of potential budget cuts we used in this game can be found here: [reduction proposals](http://innovationgames.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/reductionproposals.pdf). 4. The pricing and structure of items on either list cannot be adjusted (this is a standard rule for _Buy a Feature_ games). 5. One Innovation Games® Trained Facilitator and One Innovation Games® Trained Observer managed each group to minimize researcher bias and record key aspects of the negotiations. 6. The game was played for 90 minutes. 7. There was no requirement that any items were purchased or cut. The community leaders were in complete control of their virtual money. 8. We prepared a [final report}(http://innovationgames.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/BidsOnly-Raw-Game-Data.pdf) that allowed City leaders to take action. An even more thorough review of the event results can be found [here](http://innovationgames.com/2011/02/san-jose-ca-community-leaders-budget-games-results/).
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile-2012-Presentation-Hohmann.pdf

Speakers


Thursday August 16, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Texas 3
  Leadership

11:00am CDT

Organizational Agility: The Hidden Goal (And Missed Opportunity) of Agile Transformation: Michael Hamman
Despite over a decade of formal attempts at agile transformation, there are very few real examples of large scale transformation success, and many examples of reversion and failures to scale. The most common pattern we see is that teams transform while everything else remains the same. This leads to increased organizational incongruence, disarray, and ultimately failure. What is needed is a notion of organizational agility that does for the broader organization what software agility does for software delivery teams. In this session we help participants make the case for such a notion, describe the paradigm shift which such a notion calls for, and provide participants with initial steps to influencing organizational agility in their workplace.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/agile2012 -- Organizational Agility FINAL.pptx.pdf

Speakers


Thursday August 16, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Texas D

11:00am CDT

How to Mentor Software Apprentices: Doug Bradbury
Everyone is looking for seasoned programmer to add to their organization. There is another option: Grow your own. Come learn about how to start an apprenticeship program within your organization. By` drawing on centuries of learning in craft and trade, we'll explore how you can build a program to teach programers in one of the oldest and best proven methods of education.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/agile 2012 mentorship.pdf

Speakers


Thursday August 16, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 3-4
  Coaching & Mentoring

11:00am CDT

Demanding Technical Excellence and Professionalism: Robert Martin
The vast majority of software developers have yet to learn the practices and disciplines that constitute professional behavior. That's because those practices have only just recently been defined. The software industry is barely fifty years old. It has taken nearly that long to figure out what software professionalism is. It is only in the last few years that a set of generally accepted software practices have been defined. But now they are here, and it's time for management to demand that professional behavior. In this talk, Robert C. Martin will describe these disciplines, and practices, and will discuss how to raise the professionalism bar in your projects and teams.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Martin

Robert Martin

CleanCoders
Robert Martin (Uncle Bob) (@unclebobmartin) has been a programmer since 1970. He is the Master Craftsman at 8th Light inc, co-founder of the on-line video training company: cleancoders.com , and founder of Uncle Bob Consulting LLC.  He is an acclaimed speaker at conferences worldwide... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Texas C
  Leadership

3:30pm CDT

Wetware Craftsmanship: Better Coaching Through Improved Understanding of the Mind: Brian Bozzuto, Devin Hedge
Modern organizations have developed an excessive focus on human beings as logical and emotionless beings at work - seeing us as no different than the computers on our desks - to the detriment of understanding and improving the way that people actually think. It's time to commit ourselves to the craft of using our brain. Learn how developments in neuroscience have given us insights into the inner workings of the mind, some of those discoveries reinforce coaching concepts that have been around for over a century, while others have novel and exciting implications on how to best utilize your most important, and very finite resource: your mind. We’ll explore the limitations of the mind, as well as strategies to amplify its effectiveness and answer questions like why stand ups should be in the morning and why that member of the team is just so resistant to your helpful suggestions.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Wetware_Craftsmanship.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Devin B. Hedge

Devin B. Hedge

Business Agility, Product Discovery and Lean Experimentation.



Thursday August 16, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 3-4

3:30pm CDT

Dollars and Dates are Killing Agile: Brent Barton
Agile teams speak in points and iterations, but project and business managers think in terms of dollars and dates. This conceptual and language barrier makes strategic business planning, funding, and progress management a significant challenge for sustained large-scale Agile. This session will include multiple case studies from large-scale Agile adoptions that we were part of and have supported over the past 7 years and how Agile values/principles went beyond just the development organizational boundaries into strategic planning and management.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Dollars and Dates are Killing Agile final.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Brent Barton

Brent Barton

Founder, River Rock Endeavors
As Principal and Founder of River Rock Endeavors, Brent strives to bring agility into the business side of organizations so we can leverage what lean and agile methods offer. Previously, Brent was a Product Line Director at Rally Software. Rally Software acquired Agile Advantage... Read More →



Thursday August 16, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Austin 1-3
  Enterprise Agile