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Learning [clear filter]
Monday, August 13
 

9:00am CDT

Hands On Agile Immersion: Damon Poole
Learn Agile and have fun at the same time! Everything you learn will be via real Agile activities that you do as a team. You’ll form into cross-functional teams, invent your own software product to use as an example for the activites, and become completely immersed in the principles and practices of Agile. There's no actual coding, no computer required, it's just fun activities that anybody can do that show you what being on an Agile team is really like. For anybody involved in development: management, product managers, business analysts, designers, developers, testers, DBAs, technical writers, project managers, etc. Bring an existing team or create a team with other participants during the session. Activities include: * Forming cross-functional, dedicated, co-located teams * Writing actual user stories for your team's "product" * Creating a backlog * Splitting stories * Estimating the stories using planning poker * Planning a release using two iterations of work * Running an Agile implementation simulation * Doing a retrospective on the simulation Throughout the session, you will also have the experience of seeing a demonstration of self-organization on a large scale.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/HandsOnAgile2012Shared.pdf

Speakers

Monday August 13, 2012 9:00am - 12:30pm CDT
Texas C
  Agile Boot Camp

1:30pm CDT

Better Code, Littler Classes: Refactoring to Separate Concerns: Moss Collum, Laura Dean
You know the basics of refactoring: you rename variables for maximum clarity, extract methods to make them nice and compact, and sometimes even extract shared code into a superclass. But how do you go beyond the basics, to get simpler classes and more modular code? In this hands-on training session, we’ll demonstrate techniques for dividing large, complex classes into small, cohesive units. You’ll learn several key class-level refactorings, when to apply them, and how to find a class for every responsibility. This is a hands-on tutorial, so bring your laptop and be prepared to write some code!
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Better Code, Littler Classes.pdf


Monday August 13, 2012 1:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
San Antonio 1-3

1:30pm CDT

TDD for [Embedded] C: Bas Vodde, James Grenning
Test-Driven Development is for Java programmers, not for C! Yes it is! Roll up your sleeves and test-drive C with us. We’ll start with a short intro to TDD, and quickly get you doing TDD. Bring your laptop. If you don’t have one, we’ll team you up with another programmer. You’ll see how to make TDD practical for embedded software development. See CppUTest Compilation Environment(http://cpputest.org/node/42) for needed tools. We’ll also have a bootable Linux DVD with all the tools so that you can join the experience.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/TDD-EC-Agile2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for James Grenning

James Grenning

Wingman Software
James Grenning trains, coaches and consults worldwide bringing modern technical and management practices to embedded systems development. He is the author of Test-Driven Development for Embedded C (http://wingman-sw.com/tddec). He invented Planning Poker, and participated in the... Read More →
avatar for Bas Vodde

Bas Vodde

Odd-e
Bas Vodde is a coach, programmer, trainer, and author related to modern agile and lean product development. He is the creator of the LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) framework for scaling agile development. He coaches organizations on three levels: organizational,  team,  individual... Read More →



Monday August 13, 2012 1:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 1-2

1:30pm CDT

Agile and the nature of decision making: Dennis Stevens
Organizations are really bad at Risk Management. And the typical approaches to risk management are flawed - resulting in bureaucratic overhead and not much improvement in the performance of software development projects. Agile efforts have rejected bureaucratic and non-value adding efforts and in the process have rejected most of what is practiced as risk management. This is unfortunate - because the nature of agile development fundamentally changes how to benefit from effective risk management. Risk management is about managing uncertainty to reduce the probability and impact of unfortunate events and the maximize the realization of opportunities. This workshop builds on concepts from SEI's MOSAIC project and Eric Reis Lean Start-up to present a practical and proven to a systemic approach to integrating threat and opportunity identification and response into the management of Agile projects. Useful for typical delivery teams, this approach is particularly valuable in the large projects and large organizations.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile and the Nature of Decision Making.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Dennis Stevens

Dennis Stevens

LeadingAgile



Monday August 13, 2012 1:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Texas 3
  Enterprise Agile
 
Tuesday, August 14
 

9:00am CDT

Scaling up Excellence: Bob Sutton
Scaling up Excellence

Speakers

Tuesday August 14, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Texas A-B
  Keynote

11:00am CDT

Achieving Business Agility to Survive and Thrive: Mike Russell
To survive, businesses must balance new product/service development effectiveness and operations efficiency. Companies fail every day from lacking balance between opposing needs of “right now” profit and investing in innovation to thrive long-term. Sometimes they careen chaotically between the two needs. Understanding business dynamics and the prevailing bias toward “stability” will help both agile adoption and achieving appropriate levels of business agility. In fact, agile approaches hold the key to a successful balance, meaning you as an agile practitioner can help your company succeed!
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Business Agility and Innofficiency - Agile 2012 final.pdf

Speakers


Tuesday August 14, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Texas D

11:00am CDT

Agile In a Nutshell: Jonathan Rasmusson
If you’ve been doing Waterfall delivery most of your career agile can be down right scary: changing requirements, adaptive planning, iterative development. These are all intimidating things for managers and organizations used to doing things in discrete phases one stage at a time. In this introductory talk, we will look at agile in simple terms explaining: * what agile is * what working on an agile project is like * some of it’s myths * which agile method is right for you, and * three steps you can take to becoming more agile today.



Tuesday August 14, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Texas 2
  Agile Boot Camp

11:00am CDT

Quality Assurance - A Team Sport: Jeff Morgan
Who is responsible for QA on an Agile team? The answer is “Everybody”. And yet this is rarely the case. Often the Testers write their test cases and automation in isolation and execute them after development is finished. Developers write their code without talking to the testers except to understand how to reproduce the latest discovered defect. Product Owners elaborate requirements in isolation and then hand them off to the team only to check back at the end of the sprint. Business Analysts spend their time in meetings away from the team working on documents that have questionable usefulness. Join Cheezy as he paints a different picture. This picture includes techniques and practices that foster collaboration between all team members that have the side effects of dramatically improving quality and achieving better flow resulting in a more streamlined development effort. This new picture is a picture of teamwork and quality assurance.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey "Cheezy" Morgan

Jeffrey "Cheezy" Morgan

Continuous Delivery Coach, Tango
Jeff been helping companies improve the way they build software since the early days of Agile. His emphasis on Continuous Delivery has fostered new technical and collaborative techniques that help teams deliver high quality software every day. He is driven by Lean values and principles... Read More →


Tuesday August 14, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
San Antonio 4-6

11:00am CDT

Clean Code: Robert Martin
Get ready for a challenge as Robert Martin dives deep into the topic of clean Java code by examining what makes a good function. In this talk you will look at a lot of code; some good and some bad. You will experience how such code is analyzed, critiqued, and eventually refactored. You will understand the decisions made by an expert in the field as bad code is gradually transformed into good code. How big should a function be? How should it be named? How should it be documented. How many indent levels should it have? How should it deal with exceptions, arguments, and return values. This talk is all about code at the lowest level. And yet the principles and techniques presented have far reaching implications.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Martin

Robert Martin

CleanCoders
Robert Martin (Uncle Bob) (@unclebobmartin) has been a programmer since 1970. He is the Master Craftsman at 8th Light inc, co-founder of the on-line video training company: cleancoders.com , and founder of Uncle Bob Consulting LLC.  He is an acclaimed speaker at conferences worldwide... Read More →


Tuesday August 14, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Texas C

11:00am CDT

TDD And A New Paradigm For Hardware Verification: Neil Johnson
The practices of unit testing and test-driven development (TDD) are mainstream for agile software development teams. While they also seem perfectly suited to the world of hardware development, where intense rigor is essential to avoiding the high costs of failure, unit testing and TDD are very rarely used. This talk proposes a new paradigm for achieving hardware quality where existing development and test practices are transformed through the addition of unit testing and TDD.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/TDD and a new paradigm for hardware verification.pdf

Speakers
avatar for neil johnson

neil johnson

Hardware Verification Engineer, XtremeEDA
Neil Johnson is a hardware test specialist and currently holds the position of Principal Consultant at XtremeEDA Corp, a design services firm specializing in all aspects of ASIC and FPGA development. He is co-moderator for AgileSoC.com, a site dedicated to the introduction of Agile... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 1-2

11:00am CDT

Why Agile Needs More Cowboys: Mike Griffiths
This presentation takes the leadership ideas of Jeffrey Pinto author of “Project Leadership: from Theory to Practice” and transforms them into an agile setting. Cowboys are resourceful, daring, and are as quick with their wits as they are with their fists. In many ways, we see cowboys as the embodiment of agile leaders. Yet, life is not a Hollywood movie. What do cowboys actually do? They lead cows. Have you ever seen anything that indicates that John Wayne knows how to lead cows? They ride horses, shoot guns, and always get the girl. But have you ever seen them with a cow? Would you want them around a cow? Your cow? They can teach us as much about being a good cowboy as Homer Simpson can teach us about being a good father. Go behind the myth, and true agile leadership characteristics emerge. A herd of cows is a lot like an organization: massive and, at times, rather aimless. It takes dedicated leadership using a score of methods to energize this bovine bulk. A good cowboy knows how to select a lead cow, direct the herd into natural flows to help lead the herd. Moving a herd into Dodge City required considerable skill. It is the real cowboy, not a stylized caricature, that teaches us something about leadership. Agile leadership is not a cookbook. You will find no recipes for leadership stew here. Rather, this presentation is intended as a guide to leadership thought and practice. Good theory underlies good leadership. Theory has received a bad rap. After all, we want doers, not thinkers, right? But, at its heart, leadership is concerned with transforming ideas and concepts into action. Your knowledge of basic principles is essential to you taking the first step to being an effective agile leader. Our six-shooter of agile leadership topics to be introduced is: 1. Craft a compelling vision of the completed project 2. Model the desired behaviour towards this vision 3. Resist meddling and recognize team conflict as a positive step 4. Act for the simultaneous welfare of the team and the project 5. Create an environment of functional accountability 6. Take time to reflect on the project and challenge the process  

Speakers
MG

Mike Griffiths

Consultant, Leading Answers
Mike Griffiths is an experienced project manager and agile coach with a long history of contributions to the agile and project management community. He helped create the agile approach, DSDM, in 1994 and has been using agile approaches on his projects ever since. He served on the... Read More →


Tuesday August 14, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Austin 4-6
  Leadership

1:30pm CDT

Baby Steps and Pervasive Feedback: George Dinwiddie
If you are new to Agile and attempting to transform your organization, it’s easy to get lost in the details of recommended practices and ceremonies. Too many groups try so hard to exactly follow the descriptions "by the book" that they miss the benefits of those practices. They overlook the very reason the practices exist. It’s more important to be effective than to attempt a large number of suggested practices. George Dinwiddie will highlight one way to judge the effectiveness of your practices in a manner that guides you in improving them.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Baby Steps and Pervasive Feedback-Agile2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for George Dinwiddie

George Dinwiddie

Grand Poobah and Jack of All Trades, iDIA Computing, LLC
George Dinwiddie helps organizations develop software more effectively. He brings decades of development experience from electronic hardware and embedded firmware to business information technology. He helps organizations, managers, and teams solve the problems they face by providing... Read More →


Tuesday August 14, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Texas 3
  Agile Boot Camp

1:30pm CDT

Kanban Pizza Game - the Kanban experience for foodies: David Bland, Dave Sharrock
The Kanban Pizza Game is a unique experience of the benefits of one-piece flow or limiting your work-in-process. You are the proprietor of a new entrepreneurial enterprise, your very own Pizza Shop. You will experience the frenetic energy required to keep up with your customers' needs before using the three simple prescriptions of Kanban to increase your productivity and even offer your customers more choice. You'll experience some subtleties of the Kanban approach before we tie everything back to how software is delivered using Kanban. -- The Kanban Pizza game was created in the summer of 2011, and has been used at Tampere Goes Agile 2011 in Finland and the Agile Coach Camp in Columbus, OH in Sept 2011. Feedback was enthusiastic, and the game has been used numerous times with clients in the passed 6 months to very positive feedback. The benefit of this game over other Kanban experiences is the level of complexity that can be introduced through the variations of pizza slices (for example, incorporating subtle changes in flow through the system). Some feedback from the Tampere exercise can be seen on the [agile42 blog](http://www.agile42.com/en/blog/2011/09/23/kanban-pizza-game/ "Kanban Pizza Game"). Kanban is a tool that allows optimization of a process by visualizing it. Kanban has just three main prescriptions: 1 Visualize the workflow 2 Limit WIP 3 Measure and optimize the average lead time **Visualize the workflow** With the physical production of the Pizza the workflow is always visually present, and with the drawing of the workflow we can reflect the current process. **Limit WIP** Through the game some bottlenecks and queues will emerge. During the game we introduce work-in-process limits to highlight the (often counter-intuitive) benefit of focusing on single piece flow, and so that the teams don't lose points for unused materials. The participants experience that WIP limits are more than just imposed limitations - they change behaviour; people interact more on the overall production, communicate more and help each other when needed. **Measure and optimize the average lead time** In the game we measure the lead time and the cycle time. We also use a point system to approximate value delivery, and in particular the cost of inventory or waste. **Some Benefits of Kanban** - Bottlenecks become clearly visible, leading to increased collaboration - Evolutionary path to agile software development - Provides a way to be agile without iterations, starting where you are - Natural tendency to spread throughout an organization

Speakers
avatar for David J Bland

David J Bland

Principal, Neo
Organizational Coaching, Lean Startup, Business Model Generation, Customer Development, Kanban
avatar for Dave Sharrock

Dave Sharrock

Agile Coach, agile42
Dad, internet veteran, husband, entrepreneur, occasional seismologist. British and almost Canadian. Agile coach and change agent. Only Certified Enterprise Coach (CEC), Certified Scrum Trainer (CST) and Certified Agile Leader (CAL) in Canada.



Tuesday August 14, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Texas 2
  Agile Boot Camp

1:30pm CDT

Strategies for Agile Portfolio Management: Kenny Rubin
Traditional portfolio management frequently uses principles that are at odds with agile thinking. For example, believing that people should be 100% utilized might lead to us to start many simultaneous projects leading to high levels of team-member multitasking. Managing a portfolio according to these principles all but guarantees a continuous stream of impediments that interfere with team-level agility and sub-optimizes delivered value. In this session I discuss strategies for aligning portfolio management with agile development to ensure a better end-to-end flow of value.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Rubin_Agile_2012_Strategies_for_Porfolio_Management.pdf.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Ken Rubin

Ken Rubin

Managing Principal, Innolution
Ken Rubin is the author of Amazon’s #1 best-selling book Essential Scrum: A Practical Guide to the Most Popular Agile Process. As an agile thought leader, Ken founded Innolution where he helps organizations thrive through the application of agile principles in an effective and economically... Read More →


Tuesday August 14, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 5-6

1:30pm CDT

Team Dynamics Interactive Games : Ken Howard
This session teaches several aspects of organizational and team dynamics in a fun, interactive environment. Three different games/exercises are played. The first game, Communication Origami, teaches the importance of collaborative communication and how different organizational models affect communication effectiveness. The second exercise, the Bridge, demonstrates facets of team organization and leadership including self-organizing teams. The final session, Close Encounters with the Other Kind, teaches how to increase communication effectiveness between individuals and the team as a whole.

Speakers
avatar for Ken Howard

Ken Howard

Author of Individuals and Interactions: An Agile Guide from Addison Wesley


Tuesday August 14, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
San Antonio 4-6

1:30pm CDT

Testing System Qualities: Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Joseph Yoder
Agile teams incrementally deliver functionality based on user stories. In the sprint to deliver features, frequently software qualities such as security, scalability, performance, and reliability are overlooked. Often these characteristics cut across many user stories. Trying to deal with certain system qualities late in the game can be difficult, causing major refactoring and upheaval of the system’s architecture. This churn isn’t inevitable. Especially if you adopt a practice of identifying those characteristics key to your system’s success, writing quality scenarios and tests, and delivering on these capabilities at the opportune time. We will show how to write Quality Scenarios that emphasize architecture capabilities such as usability, security, performance, scalability, internationalization, availability, accessibility and the like. This will be hands-on; we present some examples and follow with an exercise that illustrates how you can look at a system, identify, and then write and test quality scenarios.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/TestingSystemQualities - Agile2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock

Wirfs-Brock Associates
I'm best known as the "design geek" who invented Responsibility-Driven Design and the xDriven meme (think TDD, BDD, DDD..). I'm keen about team effectiveness, communicating complex requirements, software quality, agile QA, pragmatic TDD, and patterns and practices for architecting... Read More →
avatar for Joseph Yoder

Joseph Yoder

Agilist, Computer Scientist, Consultant, Object Oriented Developer, ..., The Refactory, Inc (www.refactory.com)
Joseph Yoder is a founder and principle of The Refactory, Inc., a company focused on software architecture, design, implementation, consulting and mentoring on all facets of software development. Joseph is an international speaker and pattern author, a long standing member of the... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Dallas 3-4

1:30pm CDT

Extreme Design — The Secrets to Successful Design Pairing: Samuel Bowles
Whether you're a designer or a developer there's a simple way to get better at both, help others around you improve, and make working together more enjoyable. The power of design pairing can produce better ideas faster and instill greater empathy for both design and programming throughout your company. Samuel Bowles will explore how his team has adopted the principles of design pairing in a number of contexts and configurations. His observations are based on the contrast between his work in traditional design firms and as a member of various Agile development teams. He will explore the various types of design pairing and especially the power of cross-functional pairing.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Design Pairing — Version 5 Agile 2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Bowles

Samuel Bowles

Software Craftsman, Mutually Human
Samuel Mikel Bowles' started his 16 year career at Burger King where he held the ambiguous title of webmaster. Still a polyglot he works as a visual & interaction designer, front end developer, and Agile practitioner at Mutually Human. He is a dedicated practitioner and international... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Dallas 1-2
  User Experience

3:30pm CDT

Continuous Delivery: Jez Humble
Businesses rely on rapidly getting valuable new software into the hands of users, while keeping production stable. Continuous Delivery is a revolutionary and scalable agile methodology that enables any team to achieve rapid, reliable releases through better collaboration between everyone involved in delivery, and automation of the build, deploy, test and release process. I’ll present the principles and practices of continuous delivery, including the deployment pipeline, acceptance test driven development, devops, and techniques for low risk releases.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/continuous_delivery_agile_2012.pdf

Speakers


Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 1-2
  Agile Boot Camp

3:30pm CDT

What's Done Is Done: An Exploration of What 'Done' Means At Various Levels: Daniel Gullo
The definition of done is a fairly popular (and sometimes emotional) topic in the Agileverse. It seems everyone has an opinion on the matter ranging from “It depends,” to “Let the teams decide,” to a meticulously designed set of business rules and criteria that account for every possible scenario. However, as organizations adopt Agile practices (and specifically, Scrum), they seek to leverage guidance from those of us who have already blazed the trail. Why then is this such a complex topic? This session will discuss what the "Definition of Done" means to different stakeholders across the organization at the User Story, Sprint, Release, Product, and Program Level. The session is based on a series of articles that I have published on this topic. Also, I have presented various versions of this session for my clients and will be doing a dry-run of the actual Agile 2012 format for one of our Wilmington ALN meetings this Spring.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/What's Done is Done - 081412 0800.pptx.pdf

Speakers

Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Texas 2
  Agile Boot Camp

3:30pm CDT

Working Effectively with User Stories: Silent Sizing and Definition of Ready: Ken Power
User stories are used to describe the functionality delivered in a product or system. Two common challenges we see recurring, even with experienced teams, are (1) they spend far too much time planning and estimating, getting trapped in the details, and (2) they have difficulty finishing user stories in a time-boxed iteration or Sprint – often realizing, despite the promise of further conversation, that they just didn’t know enough about the user story before taking it on. This hands-on session introduces participants to two techniques to deal with these problems. The first is Silent Grouping, which allows teams to collaboratively size even very large backlogs in minutes. The second is Definition of Ready, which is a set of agreements that lets everyone know when a user story is ready to begin. Combined, these techniques can save your teams literally hundreds of hours in time.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile 2012 Working Effectively With User Stories.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Software Engineering Leader, https://kenpower.dev/
Ken Power has held multiple positions in large technology organizations. His current responsibilities include leading global, large-scale engineering organization transformations. He has been working with agile and lean methods since 1999. He holds patents in virtualization and network... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Texas 3
  Agile Boot Camp

3:30pm CDT

Writing High Quality Code: David Bernstein
This presentation will help you quantify software qualities. Quality in delivered software is intangible and very different from quality in physical goods. Some external attributes of quality software—free from defects and easy to maintain—are reflections of the code’s internal qualities. When classes and methods are cohesive, non-redundant, well-encapsulated, assertive, and explicitly coupled, they are less prone to mistakes and far easier to debug, test, and maintain. David Bernstein asserts that paying attention to code quality helps us focus on the key principles, patterns, and practices used by expert developers. If you don’t pay attention to critical code quality attributes, iterative development practices can quickly degrade code into a maintenance nightmare. Join David and take a deep dive into the code qualities that make software more maintainable and less bug friendly. Create software that not only provides value now but also is easy to change and extend so it can continue to deliver value far into the future.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Writing High Quality Code for Agile2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for David Bernstein

David Bernstein

Consultant, To Be Agile
David Scott Bernstein is the author of the new book _Beyond Legacy Code: Nine Practices to Extend the Life (and Value) of Your Software._ It’s an insider’s view of the software industry drawn from his decades of hands-on experience as a software developer, trainer, and consultant... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
San Antonio 1-3

3:30pm CDT

Simple Methods for Reliable User Involvement: Hugh Beyer
One of the difficult problems faced by an Agile team is that of getting reliable user input. Because Agile projects depend on minimal up-front planning and specification, user feedback is critical. But product owners are rarely users themselves and the actual end-users are often located elsewhere and may be highly diverse. This session introduces participants to Contextual Inquiry (CI), a proven field research method for understanding users and their needs. We introduce CI, show how it fits into Agile development, and give participants practice in gathering data and then writing user stories.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Simple_Methods_for_Reliable_User_Involvement.pdf

Speakers


Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Dallas 1-2
  User Experience
 
Wednesday, August 15
 

9:00am CDT

Affordance-Driven Process Improvement: Designing a Process that Works for Your Team: Michael Keeling, Ariadna Font
The best processes are those that encourage teams to naturally do the right things at the right times. Amazing processes like this don’t happen by accident; they are specifically designed to encourage desirable behavior while discouraging harmful behaviour. By carefully choosing the process’s affordances -- practices or artifacts that direct our thinking toward a specific goal -- a team can tailor a process that makes success intuitive. The session will begin by presenting the core concepts behind affordence-driven process improvement before diving into a collaborative workshop. During the workshop teams will use information from the introduction to brainstorm practices that will help them promote those values, as you would in a team retrospective. Intended Audience * People new to agile who don’t know where to start * High-level executives and managers who want to take an active role in shaping their team’s future * Process improvement professionals who want to explore a new way to look at teams and organizations * All design, Process and team fanatics
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/process-affordances-workshop.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Ariadna Font

Ariadna Font

UX Lead & Development Manager, IBM
I'm the UX Lead at Vivisimo, an IBM Company, building enterprise search software. I have been practicing, introducing and spearheading Agile and UX methods at Vivisimo with the ultimate goal to improve communication, gain shared understanding and increase happiness. I strive to... Read More →
avatar for Michael Keeling

Michael Keeling

Staff Software Engineer, LendingHome
Michael Keeling is a software engineer at LendingHome and the author of Design It!: From Programmer to Software Architect. Prior to LendingHome, he worked at IBM on the Watson Discovery Service. Keeling has a Master of Science in Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from the College of William and Mary... Read More →


Wednesday August 15, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Texas 3

9:00am CDT

Testing As We Go: Perspectives on Testing as part of Done: Elisabeth Hendrickson
How does Testing fit into the definition of Done? Isnʼt meeting the quality standards everyoneʼs job? What is the role of Testers on an agile team? How do you keep from doing all the testing at the end of the sprint? Doesnʼt going agile mean that software development doesnʼt need Testers anymore?

Speakers
avatar for Elisabeth  Hendrickson

Elisabeth Hendrickson

Author, "Change Your Organization"
Elisabeth Hendrickson is a leader in software engineering. She most recently served as VP R&D for Pivotal Software, Inc. A lifelong learner, she has spent time in every facet of software development, from project management to design for companies ranging from small start-ups to multinational... Read More →


Wednesday August 15, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Dallas 6-7
  No Bull Know How

11:00am CDT

The undocumented Agile Practice: take your team to the next level!: Gino Marckx
Some teams seem to benefit more than others from the agile practices they introduce. Why is this? Most of the agile practices are well described, some of them even have whole books dedicated to how they work and how they can be customized to your specific organization and context. Yet, for many teams, applying these practices seems a significant challenge that sometimes even leads to less than good results and moving away from the introduced practices altogether. The foundation of many of the agile practices is collaboration, not just working next to one another, but true collaboration around a common goal. Great collaboration comes from a healthy team dynamic, and without this, a lot of the value of agile practices goes to waste or might even result in counterproductive situations. This session will show you how a healthy team dynamic creates a solid foundation for any agile implementation and how coaching can help to set your team up for success!
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Undocumented Agile Practice - Agile2012.pdf

Speakers


Wednesday August 15, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Austin 4-6

11:00am CDT

How to play basketball with a soccer team? Making IC development more agile.: Tobias Leisgang
How different is software and IC development? Let's answer with a relative estimation: It's as different as soccer and basketball. Besides both being team sports and the goal to score more points than the other team, everything else if different. If software and IC development are that different, why should Agile work in an IC development environment? Wait! Let's have a closer look. There are more commonalities as you can see on the first glance. IC development also requires satisfying customer requirements as early as possible, deals with changing requirements, needs to have frequent product releases and requires technical excellence and good design. And these are certainly areas where agile principles have been proven to be successful. As an IC development organization for an embedded microcontroller we experienced over the last projects that the "game" changed. While projects got more complex and development cycle times longer, customers required products earlier than before and new requirements came up more frequently. It was time to change the way we play! This talk demonstrates how we changed our existing IC development flow to an Agile IC development process. It shows which agile practices we’ve chosen and how we applied them to our development process. It shows the challenges we faced in the transition and the success stories we experienced. It also gives an outlook how the process can be even more agile. The session isn’t tailored to hardware developers only. I envision a lively discussion among participants from different domains on how the development process can be further refined, enhanced, applied to other organizations and maybe it can also trigger some additional thoughts for existing agile practitioners.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile2012_SoccerWithABasketballTeam.pdf

Speakers


Wednesday August 15, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 1-2

11:00am CDT

User Driven Development: Alline Watkins
As Agile Development drastically changed the Waterfall world, the Lean Startup concepts will drastically change Agile Development, mainly for enterprises. [Eric Ries](http://startuplessonslearned.com) is brilliantly teaching us how to deal with uncertainty in the business world. It is about time to take advantage of these techniques and learn how to apply them in the whole software development process. User Driven Development is Agile Development revised to incorporate the Lean Startups principles.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/User_Driven_Development.pdf

Speakers


Wednesday August 15, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Dallas 1-2
  User Experience

1:30pm CDT

Values of the Fittest - Taking Cash and Staking Claims: Allen Hurst, Chris Weldon
Are you willing to put everything on the line to squeeze every last dollar from your customers? Will you sacrifice quality to get that killer feature out the door? Will you ride the next trend in social media or focus more on premium features to grab those elite customers? What will your competition do? Values of the Fittest is a game that will challenge you and your stakeholders to take decisive actions to build software by maximizing value, minimizing risk, and minimizing cost. Time is of the essence. You have limited funds and need to deliver a product quickly to stay afloat. Opponents are capitalizing while your team wages civil war. Can your team find a common direction to deliver a better product in less time?

Speakers
avatar for Chris Weldon

Chris Weldon

Manager, Software Development, Wolters Kluwer
Chris Weldon is a passionate software craftsman, technical manager, and coach. As a manager and coach, it is his mission to understand each team members' career aspirations and help them reach their full potential. Chris works across the organization to build strong relationships... Read More →



Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 5-6

1:30pm CDT

Agile2012 Program Review & Feedback - A Panel Discussion: Mitch Lacey
This is your opportunity to meet with, hear from, and ask questions of the Agile 2012 Program Chairs: Michele Sliger, Peter Provost and Pete Behrens along with the Agile 2012 Conference Chair Mitch Lacey. The program chairs, under the guidance of the Agile 2012 Conference Chair, spent almost a full year building the Agile 2012 program from defining the stages and the program schedule, seeding the stage review teams, developing the submission schedule, overseeing the submission process, aligning the stages and sessions to the conference facilities, and pulling together the final program. We would like an opportunity to share our approach in building the program and hear your feedback on your experience through that review process and the results of the program. This session is for you if any of the following apply: 1. You would like to know more about how the program and stage review process works and how submissions were selected for Agile 2012 2. You are interested in getting more involved in the program or stage review process in the future 3. You would like to meet with and/or get to know better those involved in putting together the Agile 2012 Program Added something else

Speakers
avatar for Mitch Lacey

Mitch Lacey

Mitch Lacey & Associates
Mitch Lacey is an agile practitioner and trainer. He is the author of "The Scrum Field Guide", a book targeting teams adopting Agile and Scrum practices. Mitch has been managing projects for over 18 years & is credited with many plan-driven & agile projects. Mitch honed his agile... Read More →


Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Texas C
  No Bull Know How

1:30pm CDT

Craftsmanship or 'The only way to go fast is to go well': Robert Martin
Isnʼt agile all about delivering faster? What does craftsmanship have to do with architecture and design? Why should I invest in strengthening my programming skills, and where do I start? Whatʼs the definition of “clean code”? No one else cares about code quality where I work, why should I?

Speakers

Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Dallas 6-7
  No Bull Know How

2:30pm CDT

Task Board Evolution: Nayan Hajratwala
As a coach, you're often asked to either help design or give opinions on task boards. This session will be a quick tour through the designs of task boards at several of my clients and how they evolved during the engagement. We'll examine the motivations behind each change and what the outcomes were.

Speakers
avatar for Nayan Hajratwala

Nayan Hajratwala

Chikli Consulting


Wednesday August 15, 2012 2:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7

3:30pm CDT

Agile FDA Mini- Plays, Mosh Pit Style: Brian Shoemaker, Nancy Van Schooenderwoert
In the FDA-regulated world, resistance to using Agile methods is still strong. We’ve turned several of the typical objections from quality and regulatory managers in the FDA-regulated industry into role-play sessions, both to explain the reason for the objection and to describe how well-managed Agile teams can answer it. By modeling the conversations you may need to have, we help you understand not just the FDA rules, but the thinking behind those rules. Our role play won’t be a “closed shop” – you can jump in too, and get your questions addressed!
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Shoemaker_VanSchooenderwoert_Agile_FDA_MiniPlays.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

President, Lean-Agile Partners, Inc.
Nancy was among the first to apply Agile methods to embedded systems development, as an engineer, manager, and consultant. She has led Agile change initiatives beyond software development in safety-critical, highly regulated industries, and teaches modern Agile approaches like Mob... Read More →
avatar for Brian Shoemaker

Brian Shoemaker

Principal Consultant, ShoeBar Associates
Brian Shoemaker consults for healthcare products companies in computer system validation, software quality assurance, and electronic records and signatures. He has conducted validation both on product software and on internal software, developed software quality systems, audited software... Read More →


Wednesday August 15, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Texas 3

3:30pm CDT

Down the Pub: How did that transition you were working on go?: Andrea Tomasini, Hendrik Esser
Imagine a reunion in the pub between you, an agile coach, and some Ericsson managers. You met some years before and the seed of an idea was planted. Over a long evening you discussed what the world would look like after completing a large-scale agile transformation. Three years later, you catch up, and learn that the transformation has been a roaring success. Through the evening you share the ups and downs, the lessons learned, and the critical success factors that made the success. Three years ago Ericsson started on a long journey to agility - over 1000 people adopting an agile mindset after over 30 years of entrenched control gate processes. Back then, there was fear and uncertainty, a will to control and preserve what made the organization successful. Today there is a completely different culture. A culture that allows the organization to sustain and keep on evolving, that allows them to achieve significant results long after you, as the coach, left. Obviously, you want to learn what worked so well? Was it your coaching ability (of course!)? Was it the uniqueness of the organization (well, they are special, but unique? No!)? What made this such a persistent and sustainably successful transformation? This is an exciting tale. In just three short years, Ericsson has made monumental changes, including: - Significantly improved predictability, in particular in relation to customers and the business department. The product pipeline is solid and reliable, and managed through business value, not release content. - Significantly improved quality, allowing Ericsson to exceed expectations even of the most demanding customers, releasing newly developed functionality ahead of schedule and skipping previously critical integration and verification gates in the process. Though many organizations achieve this while being coached, Ericsson has built up an internal capability able to continually learn and improve. Reflecting on what went well, we have identified five keys to sustainable change. The first two, People and Practices, are well-understood. The last three, Perseverance, Protection and Patience, are more cultural characteristics. You will learn how these were introduced and encouraged, and how Ericsson was able to bring about widespread adoption of such deep skills in a very short time. If you are interested in knowing how an organization with a couple of thousand employees was able to learn how to continuously improve, and make that transformation to agility a successful long lasting journey, you can't miss this fly-on-the-wall view of the pub reunion. Join us, Andrea Tomasini, the executive agile coach, and Hendrik Esser, VP Portfolio Management, share their story in a relaxed atmosphere.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Ericsson_Success_Story_agile2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

Growing up in the 1980s I was a passionate computer game developer during my school and study times. After getting my diploma in Electrical engineering I started at Ericsson in 1994 as aSW developer. From 1996 I worked in project management roles. Since 2000 I am working as a manager... Read More →



Wednesday August 15, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Texas D

3:30pm CDT

Using Rapid Prototyping for Design Iteration: Hugh Beyer
In theory, Agile projects can iterate their design with users through the regular sprint process. In practice, few projects can afford to revisit completed stories repeatedly until they are right. It’s critical that stories define user needs correctly from the start. Paper prototyping is a key technique for iterating a design with users before development work on a story starts. In this session, we show how to build effective prototypes and how to use them in field interviews to get the most reliable feedback.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Using_Rapid_Prototying_for_Design_Iteration.pdf

Speakers

Wednesday August 15, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Dallas 1-2
  User Experience

4:30pm CDT

Overcoming Traditional Project Release Reporting with an Agile Approach Focused on Change: Hans Samios
Overcoming Traditional Project Release Reporting with an Agile Approach Focused on Change ========================================================================================= Introduction ============ We are a 30 year old product development shop with more than 450 technical people. For years we have been using a traditional approach to the reporting of progress on releases using traditional stage-gate and project management approaches. The project management approach had been automated to a significant degree and was well entrenched within the organization. A lot of the standard discussion on release reporting fails to address the legitimate concerns of executive management for this large a development group as it focuses on team rather than the organization needs. If not addressed this creates resistance to the adoption of Scrum / Agile which, given all the other cultural issues that need to be addressed could seriously distract and even jeopardize the implementation. What is required is an approach which maintains the integrity of the Scrum team approach while still providing data to the business that allows them to make decisions. When I say "traditional" reporting, what am I talking about? I am talking about weekly schedules meetings to determine whether we are all on track, Microsoft Project based schedules with standard stage gates for approvals, pages and pages of documentation on current status, data held privately to the development shop and so on. When I say "maintains the integrity of Scrum team approach" what am I talking about? I am talking about team based estimates using points, simple encoding on user stories to allow categorization of data, roll-up reporting to generate release and portfolio views from team views and a set of 5 simple reports that really do provide everything that everyone needs. Principles of Reporting ======================= The session explores the following general principles of release reporting and provides specific examples of use. * Make everything (I really mean this) available to everyone in the organization. * Make sure that reporting can be done simply, with no additional work required by the teams, and using simple approaches to categorize data. * Base release reporting on changes that we are seeing in the progress of the release project as opposed to reporting on the plan so that everyone can understand the current state of the plan. * Ensure that reports are the same at all levels (team, product release, portfolio), based on the same information (team based estimates and velocity) and producing the same results so that everyone is looking at their view of the same data. * Ensure that you interview "C" levels in your organization to understand their areas of interest in the reporting so that, again, everyone is looking at the same data and making their decisions by the same criteria. * Ensure there is a continuum of reporting that not only helps with business but more importantly helps the teams so that the data required by the business are a natural by-product of normal team work. Questions ========= How did you uniquely scale, blend, adapt or evolve agile practices? ------------------------------------------------------------------- Starting with the basic "release burn-up" chart sourced from team data (story point estimates and velocity), we developed and sold internally the notion that five simple reports would give us everything we need to run the business: * Release burn-up, with trend-lines: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who is trying to optimize the delivery of a product release in terms of date, scope, and cost need a way to show what the current scope in the release and progress we are making toward it so that we can make well-informed trade-offs and commitments based on the reality of our company's capabilities." * Scope change report: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who wants to communicate with the stakeholders need a way to show how the work for a release has changed from the original baseline to the current status so that everyone is really informed about the current status of the plan." * Epic progress report: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who wants to understand the status of the release need a way to show how work is progressing against the major epics of the release so that I can make adjustments in the plan based on completion of these epics." * Investment allocation report: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who wants to make good investment decisions need a way to show how work is split in terms of the basic investment categories management report against so that I can make predictions for future plans based on history and make adjustments during execution of a release when these assumptions do not work out." * Project allocation report: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who wants to make good investment decisions need a way to show how work is split in terms of the next release and existing fielded releases the Scrum Team is working on so that I can make predictions for future plans based on history and make adjustments during execution of a release when these assumptions do not work out." The only adjustments required to produce the reports were some simple attribution on the user stories which the Product Owners were glad to do since it gave them the information that they could use. What mistakes did you make? What insights have you gained that others need to know about? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The biggest mistake I made was underestimating the amount of inertia associated with the traditional reporting model. What I should have done was simply tackle this issue much earlier. If I had done this I suspect that there would have been less managerial resistance to the adoption of agile. A second mistake I made was not supplying better templates to produce the information required. This lead to confusing when amongst the people that wanted to do this reporting since they virtually had to learn how to do it themselves. What was it like integrating agile development into to the rest of your organization? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The issue of release reporting became an impediment. I used to think "those management people just do not understand the whole 'agile' concept." I thought they wanted project reporting against "the plan." I found out they did have legitimate concerns that we were not addressing. What they actually wanted was standardize reporting that answered key questions about "where are we", "are we heading in the right direction", "when do we expect something", "what decisions need to be made today" and so on. While I am sure they would have liked to have a predictable plan, it was my understanding that they were asking for traditional reporting. Nothing could be further from the truth. By taking the time to understand the requirements (capturing them as user stories) I could take the issue off the table which meant that we ended up with a smoother transition. How successful were you in overcoming challenges? What challenges remain? ------------------------------------------------------------------------- The main challenge that remains is moving to this work to a tool so that we can automate the process. We have sold the concepts, are producing the reports manually but it is taking time when it should be easy to automate. If you’ve been doing agile development for some time, how have your values or ways of working changed? What are you doing now and why? -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lesson learned - don't let your assumptions about others lead you to thinking that you understand everything. As an agile coach you can easily fall into the trap of hubris.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Overcoming Traditional Project Release Reporting with an Agile Approach Focused on Change v04.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Hans Samios

Hans Samios

Agile Coach / Scrum Master, Intergraph
Working with people to improve the overall system of delivery.


Wednesday August 15, 2012 4:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 7
 
Thursday, August 16
 

9:00am CDT

De-Mystifying Kanban: Understanding Its Many Faces: Alan Shalloway
There is a lot of confusion about what Kanban is. Some of this is due to the fact that many people who have never used Kanban have been deriding it – saying it is a mechanistic team management method that doesn’t respect people. The fact that Kanban is quickly growing and gaining a reputation for success where other Agile methods have had challenges belies that categorization. But what is Kanban? Even when listening to Kanban thought leaders one will hear different answers. 1) it’s a power agile management system based on lean-flow. 2) it’s a transition management method to assist teams to achieve continuous learning. 3) It’s a way to create visibility for executives to improve their product portfolio management. I can almost here Gilda Radner and Dan Aykroyd on Saturday Night Live describing New Shimmer! This talk discusses how Kanban actually is a multi-faceted method that assists process, transition and collaboration. Kanban is not a mere tool, or even a set of practices. It’s a mindset that attends to people, their culture, and the systems they find themselves working in. The talk presents a few of the basics of Lean-Flow and theory of constraints that it is based on as well as some of the psychological aspects of people adopting new methods. While this talk is intended for those considering adopting Kanban, those currently using Scrum will find it helpful as many of the principles and practices of Kanban fit well into the Scrum framework.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/IntroToKanban_Agile2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Al Shalloway

Al Shalloway

CEO, Net Objectives
Founder and CEO of Net Objectives.Co-founder of Lean-Kanban University (no longer affiliated). SPC Trainer. Co-author of 4 books on Lean, Scrum, Design Patterns and Agile Design. Happy to talk to anyone who wants a free consult. Also, are looking for folks who'd like to work with... Read More →



Thursday August 16, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Texas C

9:00am CDT

Using the Competing Values Framework & Five Dysfunctions to Improve Collaboration: Clement 'James' Goebel, Lisamarie Babik
It is not enough to tell the members of your team to be more collaborative. Telling them to "try harder" is not a recipe for success. Instead, improved results come from helping your team see the world in a different light, giving them new tools to use, and the opportunity to practice and fail before expecting mastery. In our organization, and in many others that we have coached, there are two frameworks that have had the greatest impact. The first is the Competing Values Framework. The second is the framework taught by Patrick Lencioni in the "Five Dysfunctions of a Team". In this session we will experience these tools, and explore how we have used them in the past, and how you might use them in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Clement James Goebel III

Clement James Goebel III

Partner / Chief Architect, Menlo Innovations
James Goebel is a founding partner of Menlo Innovations. Menlo uses highly collaborative project teams to design and implement innovative products for clients that place high value on user adoption. The team he helped build at Menlo Innovations has successfully blended an Extreme... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
San Antonio 4-6

11:00am CDT

The evils of multi-tasking and how personal Kanban can help you: Sandy Mamoli
We know for a fact that multi-tasking slows us down both physically and mentally. Agile, Lean, Scrum and Kanban limit work in progress (WIP) on a team and organisational level but what about the personal space? What practices can we use as individuals to avoid multi-tasking and achieve flow? This session will explain the research on and theory behind why multi-tasking is bad at every level and through telling the story of Snapper, a company based in New Zealand, I will show how an entire organisation organically adapted Agile practices to extend from the organisational and team level to the personal and individual space. I will demonstrate how personal Kanban works and how my colleagues and I are using it. I will talk about how Agile on a team level has helped us adopt Agile and Lean practices in our daily work lives and will describe how everyone at Snapper and the organisation as a whole have benefitted from the use of personal Kanban. I will also show the personal Kanban boards that have popped up everywhere around the office. Come along and learn how personal Kanban can help you!
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/kanban41.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Sandy Mamoli

Sandy Mamoli

Me, Nomad8
I'm a former Olympian, a geek, a gadget junkie, international speaker and author of "Creating Great Teams - How Self-Selection Lets People Excel". I have a masters degree in artificial intelligence and I know quite a lot about Agile.


Thursday August 16, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 1-2

1:30pm CDT

Journey to Agility: Coaching a Transformation: Skip Angel
How far can you take Agile within an organization? Is it enough to just focus on Agile team practices like Scrum and XP or is something more needed? Agile is much more than a selection of an SDLC methodology for your teams. It can become a larger organizational change for more agility beyond just product development. The speaker will provide you with an approach that has worked with larger transformations with real life examples of how he has taken companies with little or no knowledge of Agile to an organization with high agility.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/BigVisible - Journey to Agility Agile 2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Skip Angel

Skip Angel

Chief Pathfinder, CA Technologies
I have over 25 years of experience in software development in a variety of roles such as Developer, Project Manager, Consultant and Chief Technology Officer. Over the last 7 years, I have provided thought leadership, training and coaching to new and experienced teams interested in... Read More →



Thursday August 16, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Texas 3

1:30pm CDT

Big Data, Little Tests: John Heintz
This session is an easy introduction to writing small automated tests for very Big Data systems. If you're considering Hadoop, Cassandra, or Riak but don't know how you would begin with good developer testing practices, then this talk is for you. I'll be showing live test execution and debugging for some very Big systems: 1. The ant/maven config to enable testing 1. How to connect to a local or in-memory testing harness 1. Demonstrate execution and debugging in an IDE The code and configuration will be published on GitHub for all to repeat what's shown. The session agenda is: 1. Brief presentation introducing Big Data technologies. 1. An hour of code/test live demonstrations. 1. Discuss the hard questions: large test datasets and test execution performance. 1. Wrap up with Q&A.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/BigDataLittleTests-Heintz.pdf

Speakers
avatar for John Heintz

John Heintz

Senior Consultant, Cutter Consortium
John Heintz is the president and principal technologist of Gist Labs. He is an experienced agile manager, particularly in lean and kanban. In 2008, John founded Gist Labs to further focus on the essential criteria for innovative success. John’s accomplishments include doubling the... Read More →



Thursday August 16, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm CDT
Dallas 3-4

3:30pm CDT

Play the Customer Development Game: A lean approach to business model discovery : Adrian Howard
Agile teams are great at building what you want—but how do you know what your customers need? In this game-based workshop you learn how Customer Development lets you discover the right product before you build the wrong business. Customer Development, a core element of Lean Startup, provides an alternative to creating a Big Business Plan Up Front. You will learn how to incrementally build a business model—using lightweight descriptions of business hypotheses that you can test against real customers.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/custdevgame-placeholder.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Adrian Howard

Adrian Howard

Quietstars
Adrian Howard is passionate about building effective teams and great products. He co-founded Quietstars to help organisations do that using Lean, Agile and User Experience practices. You'll find Adrian working with startup and product development teams — doing everything from... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Ft. Worth 5-6

3:30pm CDT

Systems Thinking through Play: Patrick Kua
Ever wonder why people behave the way they do, and it doesn't make any sense? Systems Thinking helps explain the unusual behaviour that arises in organisations, teams and individuals. Learning to see what might be driving people's behaviour helps you improve your team and organisation's ability to collaborate more effectively. Fear not as this won't be lecture. It's hard to fully develop an appreciation of Systems Thinking (and often harder to explain it), so why not experience for yourself through a series of engaging activities. Each activity will explore a key concept of Systems Thinking and leave this workshop looking at the world from a different perspective.

Speakers
avatar for PATRICK KUA

PATRICK KUA

Chief Scientist, N26
Patrick Kua is the chief scientist of the mobile bank N26 (Berlin, Germany), where he is building the engineering group that will change modern retail banking for people like you and me. Formerly a Principal Technical Consultant at ThoughtWorks, he is the author of three books, The... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
San Antonio 4-6

3:30pm CDT

Adopting CMMI® into Your Scrum Methodology: Susan Strain, Lee McKinney
To some, the combination of Capability Maturity Model-Integration (CMMI®) and Scrum is akin to the mixture of oil and water. We will alleviate some of the concerns that participants may have when CMMI® is introduced into a Scrum environment. At a high level, attendees will be able to crosswalk their Agile/Scrum artifacts to satisfy evidentiary requirements for a Maturity Level 2 Standard CMMI® Appraisal Method for Process Improvement (SCAMPI A). Then they will learn how to tie up the loose ends with other standard project management artifacts. The end result will be a fully-populated Scrum/CMMI® alignment matrix.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Geocent Scrum CMMI (without animations).pdf


Thursday August 16, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm CDT
Texas 3
  Enterprise Agile
 
Friday, August 17
 

9:00am CDT

Adventures of an Accidental Entrepreneur. A High Tech Teleradiology Venture from India: Dr. Sunita Maheshwari
This presentation traces the journey of a one man one room company in India started by a Doctor without a job, to its present status as the number 1 nationally ranked teleradiology company in the United States. Lessons learnt along the way of this unlikely journey are lessons for all entrepreneurs and employees. The convergence of technology and healthcare is brought alive in this session by a Yale trained Pediatric Cardiologist turned India based health care entrepreneur.


Friday August 17, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am CDT
Texas A-B
  Keynote

11:00am CDT

Managing a collaborative multi-national team in real time: Joe Justice
Team WIKISPEED entered a $10 Million competition to produce road legal 100+ mpg cars. They built the impossible in three months. Joe Justice will talk about Agile practices applied to enormously speed up physical manufacturing. Joe leads WIKISPEED, a team of 71 volunteers in 6 countries, and walks through how their 100 MPG road car was made possible through modular design, iterative development, and Agile project management. Joe takes a deep dive on exactly how Agile from software projects is applied to physical engineering and manufacture. Joe will use the example and of the design and development of their revolutionary 100 mpg, gasoline powered, four-seat car with a target price of $17,995. This ground breaking work expands the agile process to design and manufacturing of the car. The talk will provide tools and take-aways for engineers and executives, in manufacturing and software, looking to improve their processes. New professionals and students can see examples of the value found in pairing, prioritized backlog driven development, and extreme programming, as they see the methodology jump from software teams to research, manufacturing, and product engineering. For those who have participated in WIKISPEED talks before, this session will be the deepest dive into Agile, Kanban and Lean applied to conquer a highly regulated industry with large, distributed collaborative teams.

Speakers
JJ

Joe Justice

President Scrum Hardware, Scrum Inc.


Friday August 17, 2012 11:00am - 12:30pm CDT
Texas A-B
  Keynote