Loading…
Agile2012 has ended

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Insights - Experience Reports [clear filter]
Wednesday, August 15
 

9:00am

A story about dinosaur called Mainframe and a small fly Agile: Zuzana Sochova, Eduard Kunce
This is an experience report about adopting agile principles on a huge, conservative, and inflexible environment of hi-performing mainframe applications. Working for critical bank and insurance projects, supporting airport infrastructures, security governmental processes, mainframes are the core backbone of many Fortune 500 companies. Such transformations bring unique challenges, and not only the technical ones. There are other challenges too, such as facing tons of legacy code and working with huge amounts of data. Both come with testing challenges as well.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/MainframesAgile2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Zuzana Sochova

Zuzana Sochova

Agile Coach & Scrum Trainer, CST, sochova.com
Zuzana “Zuzi” Šochová is an independent Agile coach and trainer and a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST) with more than fifteen years of experience in the IT industry. She started with agile and Scrum back in 2005, when she was implementing agile methods in the USA. From that time... Read More →


Wednesday August 15, 2012 9:00am - 9:30am
Ft. Worth 7

9:30am

Scaling Scrum step by step: “The mega framework”: Rafael Maranzato
We will describe our experience of scaling scrum from one single team to seven teams during 2010 and 2011. To do that, we will talk about the new meetings we added to our scrum framework to improve team communication and synchronize the parallel sprints that we run to develop the most important online payment system in Brazil. We will address the steps that we did and the focus on values instead of rules that is the basis of our agile environment. This work is a continuation of our first paper about this topic (Moving back to scrum and scaling to scrum of scrums in less than one year)) presented at SPLASH 2011 conference. Now we plan to emphasize our “mega scrum framework”, that allows us to add more teams to the same product more easily. Our first work was focused on our experience of implementing scrum in a team that had already tried it and failed and in less than year scaled it to four teams. At this moment, we can say that we have learned how to handle multiple teams in parallel in the same product. Nowadays, we have a framework and for us it is quite simple to start a new team (but it was not easy in the beginning). The focus of the first paper was on values like transparency and commitment and a vision that we could have more than two teams working in different backlogs but everyone belonging to one big team. In this propose to agile 2012, we will emphasize the mechanism of framework that we created to scale scrum: “the mega framework”. It is important to say that the development team and the business team agreed that the product backlog had a lot of different areas and the existent team was not sufficient to deliver as the market expected (There are historical reasons for that and we will detail them in the paper). So we started our strategy of adding and hiring people to existent teams before creating new ones. As new people learned the values and how we work, we started a new team. With more than three teams we learned that it would be important for everyone to know the sprint backlog of the other teams and to know the course of the parallel sprint. So we created two meetings: mega planning and mega daily. The first one happens just after the plannings and the second one in the middle of the sprint. At this point we created our “mega framework” with the challenges of continuing being agile. In the beginning (with two or three teams) it was possible to have meetings with everyone, but nowadays, there are so many people – the meetings were not productive and there is no room for everybody. So we learned and adapted them to meet our needs. We will detail that in the paper. One important lesson that we learned was the necessity of improving the communication of the team and between product owners and scrummasters. So we created some rules to do that, improving our development process. Another important lesson that we learned was that scrummasters and product owners must be synchronized but that was not only their responsibility – the team must know what the other teams are developing. We can detail that and we believe that point is one of the biggest challenges to scale scrum. Another relevant point to share is that we improved the productivity of the team. We observed that the velocity of the teams increases when they have a focus – with two or three teams, there were many different subjects to handle. Another metric is that the revenue of the business increases in a ratio that is bigger than the team expansion – so the team is delivering value to the clients can be observed in this scenario. So, we think that story is very useful to the agile community because we have learned a lot (and continue to learn) and now we have a framework that makes easy to add new teams. We also believe that everyone can adapt that to start a process of scaling agile in their teams. Of course we have more details of each point and we plan to discuss them in the paper.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/scaling-scrum-mega-framework.pdf

Speakers


Wednesday August 15, 2012 9:30am - 10:00am
Ft. Worth 7

10:00am

Successfully bootstrapping a large scalable Scrum practice at Royal Dutch Shell: David Segonds
We will present the saga of a successful transformation from a struggling software development group to a scalable Scrum practice within Royal Dutch Shell. This group of sixty individuals encountered many obstacles on their journey to carry on the development of a large, 25 year old, legacy application. Come and see how, over two years, we implemented a set of organizational, technological, procedural, and cultural changes to lead this group forward. Finally, we will present our vision to further strengthen and accelerate this value delivery system.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Successfully-bootstrapping-a-large-scalable-Scrum-practice-at-Royal-Dutch-Shell.pdf

Speakers


Wednesday August 15, 2012 10:00am - 10:30am
Ft. Worth 7

11:00am

Embracing Nihilism as a Software Development Philosophy: Ryan Bergman
How do we get developers to let go of their ego and do what’s best for the customer? How do we encourage an environment where developers do not hold code sacrilegious and feel free to refactor or delete code? This session will go over strategies for teams to embrace YAGNI and celebrate the purging of dead code. For the majority of the presentation I will talk about how a team I was on came to produce a 500+ page “Big Book Of Dead Code” off of a legacy application. Producing this book reduced build times, reduced bugs, and became rallying point for developers. It’s very existence helped encourage simple design and clean code. It also spawned a competition amongst developers to see who could add more to the book. I will also talk about how this powerful visualization helped to change the way the business itself thought about code, planning, and quality. I would expect this presentation to be of benefit to almost everyone involved in software development but especially for anyone struggling with trying to introduce agile and TDD to a legacy application. I have presented at various Iowa technology related user groups and IT departments. I have also been involved with the Hyperstream project from the Technology Association of Iowa. This is a project where local technologists work with high school and middle school students on projects that benefit the school and the community. The goal of the project is to encourage young people to purse careers in technology. This goes beyond just programming and includes art and design, marketing, business, and science. I work directly with students as a mentor on a weekly basis and I help the students present their projects to school boards and the community. My style is pretty loose and I try to keep the group engaged by not overloading on too much raw data at once. If you are looking for Agile Alliance reviewers who have worked with me and can give you a feel for my style please talk to Tim Ottinger or Brandon Carlson. This is a new presentation but some of the content can be found in these two blog posts: http://ryber.tumblr.com/post/4745553646/the-big-book-of-dead-code http://ryber.tumblr.com/post/11716935907/night-of-the-undead-code
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/DeadCodePresentation.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Bergman

Ryan Bergman

Lead Product Engineer, John Deere Intelligent Solutions Group
I care about the craft of writing good, working code. I have a passion for agile practices that help enforce repeatable, predictable behavior and produce software clients actually want to use. Areas of particular interest include architecture, security, application usability, CI... Read More →



Wednesday August 15, 2012 11:00am - 11:30am
Ft. Worth 7

11:30am

Agile's Role in Developing Robust Software Competency at Precor: Brent Barton, Brent Brooks
Established in 1980, Precor sets the standard for quality, innovation, and performance in exercise equipment. Precor has distinguished itself as a worldwide industry leader, providing state-of-the-art fitness equipment to health clubs, hotels, spas, fitness centers, and private homes all over the world. Precor is number one in the fitness equipment industry in both product offerings and service quality [Source: 2009 Health Club Equipment Benchmarking Report]. At the same time Precor is a great place to work, as evidenced by honors as a finalist in the Puget Sound Business Journal's 2010 Washington's Best Workplaces in the Large Business category. Precor began by launching the first ergonomically sound rowing machine in 1980, and have been supporting the natural movement of the human body ever since. In 1990, Precor created the first cushioned treadmill. Precor introduced the world to the Elliptical Fitness Crosstrainer™ (EFX®) in 1995. Then in 2007, Precor released the revolutionary Adaptive Motion Trainer® (AMT®), a breakthrough piece of cardio equipment that constantly and fluidly adapts to your stride length and motion. Precor decided to continue its leadership and innovation by delivering a completely new fitness experience through the use of embedded and networked capabilities. This represents a significant shift from a product mindset to a platform capability for Precor. Software became extremely complex and a critical competency for Precor which was a radical and transformative change. This research paper investigates the trials and tribulations of developing a whole new competency in software in order to deliver our next level of innovation.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Precor Agile Alliance Presentation - 1208.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Brent Barton

Brent Barton

Founder, River Rock Endeavors
As Principal and Founder of River Rock Endeavors, Brent strives to bring agility into the business side of organizations so we can leverage what lean and agile methods offer. Previously, Brent was a Product Line Director at Rally Software. Rally Software acquired Agile Advantage... Read More →



Wednesday August 15, 2012 11:30am - 12:00pm
Ft. Worth 7

1:30pm

Combining Kanban and Scrum - lessons from the team of sysadmins: Kate Terlecka
Kanban is becoming a fashonable term in the Agile world. Is it really an answer to all of our problems? Join me in discovering how a team of sysadmins dragged the best of it, added a chunk of Scrum and came up with a clear and sustainable process for support teams. Then, let’s take a look at another team that successfully followed their example.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile2012 2.0.pdf

Speakers

Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Ft. Worth 7

2:00pm

There and back again - from iterative to flow... and back to iterative!: Cecilia Fernandes
Come and hear the story of a team that started with Scrum, transformed their process in a lean-like approach and then were back to iterative. It had a promising start and, just when it feels like the perfect story, things collapsed and the team was taken by a great doom. Fortunately, difficult times and strongly willed people work well together and peace was restored. The team has started with Scrum, which worked well for a long time. Then, due to context particularities and using retrospectives, the team began to deconstruct Scrum, not by chance but through well thought decisions, and ended up in a single piece continuous flow process. The turning point was when, carried away by the success of removing Scrum practices and ceremonies, the team decided they didn't need a regular retrospective. Then the team experienced the effects of relying mostly on discipline and how hard it is to revert that situation without their main continuous improvement tool. Fortunately a call to action saved their moral and put things (and people) together again. Join us for this fast paced talk where you will get to know which particularities motivated changes, the advantages of those changes and how this team surpassed that great difficulty.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/there-and-back-again-med-res.pdf



Wednesday August 15, 2012 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Ft. Worth 7

2:30pm

Task Board Evolution: Nayan Hajratwala
As a coach, you're often asked to either help design or give opinions on task boards. This session will be a quick tour through the designs of task boards at several of my clients and how they evolved during the engagement. We'll examine the motivations behind each change and what the outcomes were.

Speakers
avatar for Nayan Hajratwala

Nayan Hajratwala

Chikli Consulting


Wednesday August 15, 2012 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Ft. Worth 7

3:30pm

Agile Portfolio Management at NYSE : Gabino Roche, Jr.
Sharing my experience in the financial industry as a Managing Director at NYSE Euronext, as well at other finance companies, in managing a business program by leveraging Agile. - **Introduction/Context** * My background and the world of finance & technologies - **Real examples of managing a portfolio by prioritizing against real business value** * Competing priorities * Revenue objectives and cost constraints * Planning a roadmap and managing opportunity costs * Prioritization against real business value whether internal business programs or client-facing deliverables * Road mapping and continuous re-planning * Validating annual stakeholder objectives - **Define the Product Owner role/team between the business and IT** * Product Owner roles between the business and IT * Typical corporate Agile evolution & adoption pains * Defining release visions and goals * Stakeholder engagement model * Adoption & Power-Users
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile Portfolio Management at NYSE.pdf


Wednesday August 15, 2012 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Ft. Worth 7

4:00pm

Scaling Product Ownership at the US Air Force - A Story of Epic Proportions!: Peter Saddington
What happens when the DoD, Air Force, Government Contractors, all decide to "Go Agile?" How do you scale Product Ownership with a bunch of Lt. Colonels, Majors, Program Managers, and multiple teams? This experience report will reveal how we looked holistically at the situation, managed tough personalities, and applied Product Ownership at scale for a multi-million dollar portal project. Come, sit down and listen to a story and be encouraged. No need to fear. Even our government can apply Agile well!
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/IEEE-Psaddington-Agile2012-V2.pdf


Wednesday August 15, 2012 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Ft. Worth 7

4:30pm

Overcoming Traditional Project Release Reporting with an Agile Approach Focused on Change: Hans Samios
Overcoming Traditional Project Release Reporting with an Agile Approach Focused on Change ========================================================================================= Introduction ============ We are a 30 year old product development shop with more than 450 technical people. For years we have been using a traditional approach to the reporting of progress on releases using traditional stage-gate and project management approaches. The project management approach had been automated to a significant degree and was well entrenched within the organization. A lot of the standard discussion on release reporting fails to address the legitimate concerns of executive management for this large a development group as it focuses on team rather than the organization needs. If not addressed this creates resistance to the adoption of Scrum / Agile which, given all the other cultural issues that need to be addressed could seriously distract and even jeopardize the implementation. What is required is an approach which maintains the integrity of the Scrum team approach while still providing data to the business that allows them to make decisions. When I say "traditional" reporting, what am I talking about? I am talking about weekly schedules meetings to determine whether we are all on track, Microsoft Project based schedules with standard stage gates for approvals, pages and pages of documentation on current status, data held privately to the development shop and so on. When I say "maintains the integrity of Scrum team approach" what am I talking about? I am talking about team based estimates using points, simple encoding on user stories to allow categorization of data, roll-up reporting to generate release and portfolio views from team views and a set of 5 simple reports that really do provide everything that everyone needs. Principles of Reporting ======================= The session explores the following general principles of release reporting and provides specific examples of use. * Make everything (I really mean this) available to everyone in the organization. * Make sure that reporting can be done simply, with no additional work required by the teams, and using simple approaches to categorize data. * Base release reporting on changes that we are seeing in the progress of the release project as opposed to reporting on the plan so that everyone can understand the current state of the plan. * Ensure that reports are the same at all levels (team, product release, portfolio), based on the same information (team based estimates and velocity) and producing the same results so that everyone is looking at their view of the same data. * Ensure that you interview "C" levels in your organization to understand their areas of interest in the reporting so that, again, everyone is looking at the same data and making their decisions by the same criteria. * Ensure there is a continuum of reporting that not only helps with business but more importantly helps the teams so that the data required by the business are a natural by-product of normal team work. Questions ========= How did you uniquely scale, blend, adapt or evolve agile practices? ------------------------------------------------------------------- Starting with the basic "release burn-up" chart sourced from team data (story point estimates and velocity), we developed and sold internally the notion that five simple reports would give us everything we need to run the business: * Release burn-up, with trend-lines: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who is trying to optimize the delivery of a product release in terms of date, scope, and cost need a way to show what the current scope in the release and progress we are making toward it so that we can make well-informed trade-offs and commitments based on the reality of our company's capabilities." * Scope change report: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who wants to communicate with the stakeholders need a way to show how the work for a release has changed from the original baseline to the current status so that everyone is really informed about the current status of the plan." * Epic progress report: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who wants to understand the status of the release need a way to show how work is progressing against the major epics of the release so that I can make adjustments in the plan based on completion of these epics." * Investment allocation report: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who wants to make good investment decisions need a way to show how work is split in terms of the basic investment categories management report against so that I can make predictions for future plans based on history and make adjustments during execution of a release when these assumptions do not work out." * Project allocation report: "I, as a Scrum Product Owner who wants to make good investment decisions need a way to show how work is split in terms of the next release and existing fielded releases the Scrum Team is working on so that I can make predictions for future plans based on history and make adjustments during execution of a release when these assumptions do not work out." The only adjustments required to produce the reports were some simple attribution on the user stories which the Product Owners were glad to do since it gave them the information that they could use. What mistakes did you make? What insights have you gained that others need to know about? ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The biggest mistake I made was underestimating the amount of inertia associated with the traditional reporting model. What I should have done was simply tackle this issue much earlier. If I had done this I suspect that there would have been less managerial resistance to the adoption of agile. A second mistake I made was not supplying better templates to produce the information required. This lead to confusing when amongst the people that wanted to do this reporting since they virtually had to learn how to do it themselves. What was it like integrating agile development into to the rest of your organization? ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The issue of release reporting became an impediment. I used to think "those management people just do not understand the whole 'agile' concept." I thought they wanted project reporting against "the plan." I found out they did have legitimate concerns that we were not addressing. What they actually wanted was standardize reporting that answered key questions about "where are we", "are we heading in the right direction", "when do we expect something", "what decisions need to be made today" and so on. While I am sure they would have liked to have a predictable plan, it was my understanding that they were asking for traditional reporting. Nothing could be further from the truth. By taking the time to understand the requirements (capturing them as user stories) I could take the issue off the table which meant that we ended up with a smoother transition. How successful were you in overcoming challenges? What challenges remain? ------------------------------------------------------------------------- The main challenge that remains is moving to this work to a tool so that we can automate the process. We have sold the concepts, are producing the reports manually but it is taking time when it should be easy to automate. If you’ve been doing agile development for some time, how have your values or ways of working changed? What are you doing now and why? -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Lesson learned - don't let your assumptions about others lead you to thinking that you understand everything. As an agile coach you can easily fall into the trap of hubris.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Overcoming Traditional Project Release Reporting with an Agile Approach Focused on Change v04.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Hans Samios

Hans Samios

Agile Coach / Scrum Master, Intergraph
Working with people to improve the overall system of delivery.


Wednesday August 15, 2012 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Ft. Worth 7
 
Thursday, August 16
 

9:00am

Can Marketing Go Agile?: Randall DeFauw
Perforce adopted Agile processes several years ago for Engineering. A mix of Scrum and Kanban techniques are in use and are widely seen as having delivered real improvements. Several managers at Perforce saw this success and wanted to reap some of the same benefits in other departments. In 2011 Perforce extended Agile processes to Marketing. Coaches were brought in and a Scrum pattern was quickly established. A year into the experiment, Marketing has seen visible improvements in transparency and collaboration. As might be expected, much work remains to be done. The eventual goal is similar to DevOps: Agile teams and processes in each department with cross-department collaboration. As we get closer to that goal, all the parts of the company will be more closely aligned and pulling in the same direction to help the business. This presentation will describe the initial transition to Agile, including all the pitfalls and growing pains. Just adopting the basic structure of Scrum (e.g. daily standup meetings) helped improve team communication and made management more aware of the work being done. But Marketing is a truly cross-functional team with schedules heavily driven by external events and other departments, with remote workers and a partner team in the UK. Some of the questions we encountered early on were: * What really constitutes a team? We all report to the same manager, but technical marketing, corporate marketing, and outreach all have very different tasks and goals. * Our sprints are heavily schedule driven: Engineering schedules and conference dates dominate our planning. That feels a lot like waterfall project management. * The whiteboard is now project management system #5. What works well inside the office doesn't work well for the folks in London or working remotely. How do we manage our communication? The current state of Agile in Marketing will come next, followed by our vision for 2012. Ideally, Marketing becomes more closely aligned with Engineering. We're looking at the right way to handle that, including options like 'scrum of scrums' or aligning scrum teams around projects instead of departments, while being aware of the dangers of rocking the boat too much. We’d like to share our experiences to help others avoid some of the challenges we faced, and hopefully learn from the community about how to drive forward. We haven't solved all the challenges yet, but we've made progress. This brief presentation will be relevant to development team leads, product managers, technical marketers, marketing managers, IT: those interested in implementing Agile practices in non-Engineering departments for intra- and inter- department productivity gains.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Can Marketing Go Agile.pdf

Speakers


Thursday August 16, 2012 9:00am - 9:30am
Ft. Worth 7

9:30am

Lean UX from UX Veterans: Lessons Learned in Creating & Launching a Complex Consumer App: beverly may
This session provides and overview and lessons learned from senior UX, product, and software development consultants' experiences in switching from consulting to actually conceiving, designing, developing and ultimately launching a complex consumer application in dating called MinIDates.com. It turns out that our extensive industry experience and past successes couldn't have prepared us for all that we encountered and learned when trying to develop and launch our own consumer startup. We'd like to share what we learned for future teams to benefit! Oxford Technology Ventures, LLC is a boutique user experience and product strategy consulting firm in New York whose members are seasoned veterans in UX, Internet, and software development. Our clients range from large Fortune 100's to small startups, and we've worked on and helped successfully launch or overhaul hundreds of products and services over the years. Like many in the consulting/ agency/ services business, we were feeling "startup envy" and wanted go develop and launch our own service. MinIDates.com was initially conceived as a showcase company case study in superior UX, cutting edge mobile tech, and Lean and Agile development processes where we wouldn't be constrained by our clients' preferences, implementation methods, and product direction revisions. We embarked on developing MiniDates.com in January 2011 after several months of conceiving the product, and ultimately launched it in beta 14 months later- when we had originally thought it would take us only 3-4 months to MVP! This session describes the process we went through - what we tried that worked and didn't, what we should have done that we didn't, and what we encountered that we couldn't have foreseen- in the belief that we can help other UX and product-focused startups and Agile teams be more effective practitioners.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/minidates-otv-agile2012-finalHR.pdf

Speakers


Thursday August 16, 2012 9:30am - 10:00am
Ft. Worth 7

10:00am

A Starting Point for Negotiations - Delivering with a Heterogeneous Team: Alfred Lorber
Sure, working with a fully cross-functional team where all member's time is 100% on the project is ideal, but we must deliver in the real world of specialization and matrixed personnel. In this presentation I will describe a methodology that we have developed that allows our Scrum team to consistently predict our capacity and deliver what we promise sprint after sprint, even though our developer's time is fragmented and specialization is to the point where team members have Ph.Ds in various needed disciplines. The key to this system is to, before each planning meeting, even though it appears blasphemes at first glance: * Map individual team member's capacity to story points. * Estimating the potential sprint backlog's user stories in story points. * Map developers to user stories. The reason this approach works, even though it appears to go against the lean principle of self-empowered teams, as well as many others, is a simple phrase we use over and over, "A starting point for negotiations." I am Scrum Master for a development team at Sandia National Laboratories, one of the three national nuclear weapons Laboratories operated by the United States Government. Our development team provides computer programs written in C++ that use numerical simulation of physical phenomena (i.e. they solve the mathematical equations that govern natural occurrences such as heat conduction, air flow, and fires) to model the physical environment encountered by nuclear weapon delivery systems. Our charter is to provide tools which allow designers to deliver safe and functional systems to the nation's stockpile. Our development team is made up almost entirely of engineer's with Ph.Ds in various disciplines such as Aerospace, Chemical and Mechanical Engineering as well as Physics and Mathematics. The outline of the presentation is as follows: * Introduction * A description of our business space. * A description of our development team's educational background, time demands, how they measure success, how their success is measured. * Our methodology, including our reliance on the the philosophy of "A starting point for negotiations." * A critical look at our methodology. * Criteria for success. * The tools we use. * Metrics demonstrating success. * Concluding Remarks

Speakers
avatar for Alfred Lorber

Alfred Lorber

Agile SME, Sandia National Laboratories
I am currently an Agile SME in the Corporate PMO (Project Management Office) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM as well as the co-lead of the Agile Community of Practice and PMO Agile Working Group. In the PMO I conduct training, coach individuals and teams, sponsor... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2012 10:00am - 10:30am
Ft. Worth 7

11:30am

Leveraging Global Talent for Effective Product Agility: Todd Little
Outsourcing is a reality in many organizations. If is very easy to make outsourcing fail. If teams are willing to put in the effort to make it work, they can discover a world of global talent that is available to help improve their product. This case study from Halliburton shows how together with two outsourcing partners they developed a comprehensive test automation strategy for their agile teams that effectively leveraged both in house and outsourced activities. This approach resulted in a significant quality improvement (90% reduction in exposed defects) from prior releases. Attendees should get the following take aways from this experience report: -outsourcing can work when used judiciously. -test automation can be outsourced -test automation is critical to maintaining development velocity -use global talent effectively and maximize value of all talent
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/GlobalAgilityAgile2012.pdf

Speakers


Thursday August 16, 2012 11:30am - 12:00pm
Ft. Worth 7

1:30pm

Agile in the bathtub: Gaetano Mazzanti
How does a company produce bathtubs in an agile way? After significant downsizing, a traditional top-down org started to apply agile/lean to their product development. Starting there with Kanban, even Marketing, Operations and Sales started to adopt Agile/Lean principles: all in a non-software context! The talk will show how the Agile/Lean approach has been applied, which have been the main issues and obstacles, which lessons can be learned that can be applied back in the software realm and entertain you big time.


Thursday August 16, 2012 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Ft. Worth 7

2:00pm

Adobe Premiere Pro: Agile Adoption success in a hyper-competitive landscape: Peter Green
Prior to adopting an agile approach, Premiere Pro suffered from brutal death marches that put people in the hospital and struggled to compete against other video production powerhouses (Apple,Avid). Since adopting scrum in 2008 and continuously improving its scrum approach and product ownership techniques the death marches are a thing of the past and Premiere Pro has taken a leadership position in the video production space. Our presentation walks you through the approach we took, the things we’ve learned, the success factors (both agile-related and not), and where we hope to go next.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/adobe_premiere_pro_scrum_adoption_peter_green.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Peter Green

Peter Green

Certified Scrum Trainer, Agile For All
Peter Green led a grass roots Agile transformation at Adobe from 2005 to 2015, starting with his own team, Adobe Audition. His influence includes the teams behind such software flagships as Photoshop, Acrobat, After Effects, Flash, Dreamweaver and Premiere Pro, as well as dozens of... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2012 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Ft. Worth 7

2:30pm

Real World Agile: Going All-In with Agile at Performance Health Technology: Chad Casady
In 2009, PH Tech went "all-in" and began the adoption of agile methodologies throughout the software development process. In this session, you'll take a multi-year journey with a growing small business and experience the transition from the blissful ignorance of cowboy-coding through the misery and despair of a sinking, dysfunctional organization, and on to the satisfaction and exhilaration that comes with a high-functioning agile team. This session describes both the pain and the fulfillment that comes with developing software in a small business, before, during, and after agile.

Speakers

Thursday August 16, 2012 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Ft. Worth 7

3:30pm

Slow Down to Go Fast: Lessons Learned Shipping Bing Voice Search on Xbox : James Waletzky, Randy Santossio
Are you the tortoise or the hare? Many software teams today practice "rapid development" techniques, and while it is true that some practices and methods produce results more quickly than others, slowing down and (potentially) building less, leads to higher quality and efficiency gains in the long run. At Microsoft, "Slow down to go fast" was the mantra of the Xbox voice search team, taking on the persona of the "tortoise" to successfully deliver on our objectives with high quality. By adhering to the principles of Agile while being agile in our methodologies and practices, the team found a flexible but structured framework to work within. Paramount to this collaboration was the close partnership between developers and testers. Out of this collaboration grew a set of philosophies and best practices that lead to a successful product launch. Come hear a development lead and senior tester talk about went well and what they learned, with a focus on slowing down to go fast to early cycle - and ultimately shipping - quality. In this session, participants will learn the what and why of our best practices, including: - The "Buddy System" employed by development and test - Code reviews, buddy building and buddy testing - Interactive design and documentation using OneNote - Driving crisp and test-driven "done" definitions - The right level of unit testing and test automation with feedback from code coverage Target Audience - Software engineers, particularly developers and testers, with a basic knowledge of agile development principles - Agile development teams that tend to ship with lower quality and large volumes of technical debt (e.g. bugs and refactoring work that never gets done) - Agile development teams that have to work with several dependencies to ship one product
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Slow Down to Go Fast - Agile 2012 - Slides.pdf

Speakers
JW

James Waletzky

Director of Agile Development and QA Practices, Crosslake Technologies
Active. Pain in the ass. Fun (at least I try). Dedicated. Organized.



Thursday August 16, 2012 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Ft. Worth 7

4:00pm

Skiing and Boxing: Coaching Product and Enterprise Teams: Sergey Prokhorenko
Successful Agile transitions depend on a coaching approach as much as development of a good sports team. One is not going to assign the same exercising programs to pro skier and boxer and exactly the same applies to the development teams In our study we summarized experience from Agile transformation projects in different areas from travel website to investment bank risk management software. What makes the difference between B2C product developer and enterprise automation consultant? We are going to discuss common points and distinctive features in requirements management, innovations, customer collaboration and team motivation.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile 2012 - Skiing and Boxing final.pdf


Thursday August 16, 2012 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Ft. Worth 7