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Leadership [clear filter]
Monday, August 13
 

1:30pm

Getting to the Next Level: Practicing Leadership Agility for Effective Agile Management: Bill Joiner, Michael Hamman
Sustaining and growing agile capability in large enterprises presents significant challenges for leaders. Underlying these challenges is the challenge of leadership itself. What does it mean to lead an agile organization? What manner of leadership does agility call for? In this hands-on workshop, we explore three “levels” of leadership agility, from the award-winning book, *Leadership Agility*. Going beyond previous conceptions of agile leadership, you will learn the rarely practiced “Catalyst” level of leadership agility, and think through how to apply its principles and practices to the larger challenges posed by today’s Agile initiatives.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile 2012 -- Leadership Agility Workshop Slides -- FINAL.pptx.pdf


Monday August 13, 2012 1:30pm - 5:00pm
Dallas 5
 
Tuesday, August 14
 

11:00am

Why Agile Needs More Cowboys: Mike Griffiths
This presentation takes the leadership ideas of Jeffrey Pinto author of “Project Leadership: from Theory to Practice” and transforms them into an agile setting. Cowboys are resourceful, daring, and are as quick with their wits as they are with their fists. In many ways, we see cowboys as the embodiment of agile leaders. Yet, life is not a Hollywood movie. What do cowboys actually do? They lead cows. Have you ever seen anything that indicates that John Wayne knows how to lead cows? They ride horses, shoot guns, and always get the girl. But have you ever seen them with a cow? Would you want them around a cow? Your cow? They can teach us as much about being a good cowboy as Homer Simpson can teach us about being a good father. Go behind the myth, and true agile leadership characteristics emerge. A herd of cows is a lot like an organization: massive and, at times, rather aimless. It takes dedicated leadership using a score of methods to energize this bovine bulk. A good cowboy knows how to select a lead cow, direct the herd into natural flows to help lead the herd. Moving a herd into Dodge City required considerable skill. It is the real cowboy, not a stylized caricature, that teaches us something about leadership. Agile leadership is not a cookbook. You will find no recipes for leadership stew here. Rather, this presentation is intended as a guide to leadership thought and practice. Good theory underlies good leadership. Theory has received a bad rap. After all, we want doers, not thinkers, right? But, at its heart, leadership is concerned with transforming ideas and concepts into action. Your knowledge of basic principles is essential to you taking the first step to being an effective agile leader. Our six-shooter of agile leadership topics to be introduced is: 1. Craft a compelling vision of the completed project 2. Model the desired behaviour towards this vision 3. Resist meddling and recognize team conflict as a positive step 4. Act for the simultaneous welfare of the team and the project 5. Create an environment of functional accountability 6. Take time to reflect on the project and challenge the process  

Speakers
MG

Mike Griffiths

Consultant, Leading Answers
Mike Griffiths is an experienced project manager and agile coach with a long history of contributions to the agile and project management community. He helped create the agile approach, DSDM, in 1994 and has been using agile approaches on his projects ever since. He served on the... Read More →


Tuesday August 14, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm
Austin 4-6

1:30pm

Leading Conflict: A Systems Intelligence Approach to Conflict Facilitation for Leaders: Michael Spayd, Lyssa Adkins
Sometimes hot and messy, other times cold and hidden, conflict surrounds us as leaders. There are two obvious choices: become the arbitrator who breaks the tie, or throw up your hands in exasperation deciding it's the team's problem. A third, more powerful approach is to become a skilled conflict facilitator. This hands-on workshop provides four interrelated systems intelligence tools and mindsets to help you prevent destructive conflict and encourage the creative kind: the positive/negative ratio, deep democracy perspective, conflict protocols and creating alignment without agreement. First laying a foundation with the team’s positive/negative behavioral ratio, this creates a positive emotional bank account to strengthen resiliency and help people "assume positive intent." We then add a behavioral structure, conflict protocols, to prepare teams for the heat of conflict, and finally introduce two core practices (deep democracy and distinguishing ‘interests’ from ‘positions’) for navigating active conflict as it occurs. The relationship systems approach, from CRRGlobal, will be taught and facilitated by two experienced agile+systems coaches.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/leading conflict handout - agile 2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Lyssa Adkins

Lyssa Adkins

Agile Coach & Consultant, LyssaAdkins.com
I came to Agile as a project leader with over 15 years project management expertise. Even with all that experience, nothing prepared me for the power and simplicity of Agile done well.My Agile experience, along with my professional coaching and training abilities, gives me the perspective... Read More →


Tuesday August 14, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Austin 4-6

3:30pm

Creating a Shared Vision: Strategies and Techniques to Inspire Teams: Brad Swanson
Does your vision inspire your team to achieve greatness? Peter Senge describes the shared vision as one the core disciplines of the Learning Organization. In this interactive session, we will explore five strategies for creating a shared vision (for a product or an organization) to move people beyond mere compliance toward a true commitment to the vision. We will then use some concrete visioning techniques, from Innovation Games(R) and elsewhere, to create our own shared vision. You'll leave with a toolbox of strategies and techniques to build a shared vision that truly inspires your team.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Shared Vision.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Brad Swanson

Brad Swanson

Senior Agile Coach, agile42 LLC
Brad Swanson is a Senior Agile Coach and Vice President at agile42. He started his software career at age 10 on the Apple IIe and is now a Certified Scrum Trainer® (CST) and Coach (CSC) with 19 years of experience in management, project and program leadership, product management... Read More →



Tuesday August 14, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Austin 4-6
 
Wednesday, August 15
 

9:00am

Transforming a Worst Nightmare Leader to Situational Leader: Dave Neuman
Individual and team performance varies by the competence and commitment with the task at hand. Leaders must be adept at diagnosing situations and versatile in applying the matching leadership style to improve the individual's or team's performance. Leaders at all levels (functional leads, scrum masters, agile coaches, managers, etc.) will gain valuable insight into the behaviors of various leadership styles and the appropriate application of those styles in situations that improve the effectiveness and outcome. Participants will have their eyes opened to the characteristics of everyone's worst nightmare leader, learn about leadership styles and versatility, and apply the concepts to turn their worst nightmare into a role model for leadership. This workshop is based on the Situational Leadership II model developed by Ken Blanchard.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Transforming Worst Nightmare Leader - Agile2012.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Dave Neuman

Dave Neuman

Digital Engineering & Emerging Technologies Leader, Brady Corporation
Dave Neuman is a seasoned technology and business leader with almost 20 years of experience working with organizations of various sizes from Fortune 100 to small, regional consulting to advising startups in roles of software engineering, product engineering, consultant, IT, PMO, and... Read More →



Wednesday August 15, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am
Austin 4-6

1:30pm

Adaptive Leadership: Accelerating Enterprise Agility: Jim Highsmith
Adaptive leadership embraces: Why Agile? Being Agile. Doing Agile. It explores why responsiveness is critical to success—from business strategy to portfolio management implications. It explores activities that an agile leader or executive must “do,” starting with four key levers for change: “Do Less,” “Speed-to-Value,” “Quality,” and “Capability.” Next the focus will be on how to “Be” agile by—embracing Adapting, Riding Paradox, Exploring, and Engaging leadership. This session will explore how Adaptive leadership is critical to transforming IT organizations.

Speakers

Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Austin 4-6

1:30pm

Influencing Teams with Psychology: Charles Suscheck
Self directed agile teams often don't have hierarchical management. This session is about using psychological tools to influence team members who don't report to you. If you need to influence others, this workshop will give you the tools. Through examples, exercises, and practice targeted to selling agile concepts, you will apply Cialdini's psychological tools (reciprocity, scarcity, commitment consistency, authority, liking, and social proof) to craft persuasive positions.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Handout.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Chuck Suscheck

Chuck Suscheck

Professional Trainer, scrum.org
Dr. Charles Suscheck specializes in agile software development methodologies, and project management. He is one the few people in the world certified to teach the entire scrum.org curriculum. He has over 25 years of professional experience in information technology, beginning his... Read More →



Wednesday August 15, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ft. Worth 1-2

3:30pm

Servant Leadership: Greg Hutchings
This session is designed to help executive, senior and mid-level management learn how to become more effective, better appreciated and happier in their changing roles in agile organizations. It is also intended to help you as a servant leader, management coach or sponsor to help managers who you know (or may even work for) to become more agile and better to work with. The workshop setting will explore servant leader patterns and anti-patterns based on the participants' own experience, to be shared and put into place. The format will be intensive small group interaction and large group sharing using a merge/diverge/merge facilitation facilitation style.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Servant Leader Greg Hutchings Agile 2012sm.pdf

Speakers


Wednesday August 15, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Texas 2

3:30pm

Winning the Agile Race: Stop Watching The Runner And Pay Attention To The Baton! : Jay Packlick, Erik Meade
Everyone knows that Agile is about ‘Individuals and Interactions’ but... what the heck does that really mean for a leader? How do you make that an actionable goal? By treating key decisions as fundamental units of work in an Agile environment, a clearer and more concise set of goals emerges. Focusing on decisions and how they're made reveals opportunities to dramatically improve interactions and increase agility not just within development but across the entire enterprise. In this tutorial we'll explore; why decisions are the real 'batons' (units of work) in the Agile race, how to visualize decision flows and bottlenecks that cripple teams, common decisions that can dramatically improve project outcomes (and how to improve them), critical questions you should be asking (but probably aren't), the diagnosis and treatment of decision maladies that diminish performance and, how to apply Bain Consulting's RAPID™ decision making model within your organization to improve the outcome of any decision.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Winning The Agile Race - Stop Watching The Runner And Pay Attention To The The Baton.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Jay Packlick

Jay Packlick

Principal / Enterprise Agile Coach, Sabre
Jay spent the first twenty years of his career getting software done in a variety of roles. Excited by how much better everything was using Extreme Programming in 2001, he’s dedicated the last twelve years of his career to learning and helping others implement better ways of getting... Read More →



Wednesday August 15, 2012 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Austin 4-6
 
Thursday, August 16
 

9:00am

Agile Values, Innovation and 
the Shortage of Women Software Developers: Ken Judy
Women are opting out of software development and leaving established software careers in disproportionate numbers. This is a material burden to the software industry and contributes to software that under-serves women as end users. Agile principles motivate practitioners to drive change into their organizations that support a humane, collaborative, empowered way of working. Organizations embracing these principles have potential to better attract and retain women (and men). As Agile practitioners should we and can we advocate for this outcome? Women represent 46% of the workplace and only 25% of software developers. Over two decades the percentage of women developers has steadily declined. 41% of women professionals leave established careers in high technology. Half leaving the sector completely. The number of women earning Computer Science bachelor’s degrees dropped 55% from 1986 to 1995 despite growing percentages of women graduating from four year colleges. And young women are significantly less interested in studying hard tech then men. Their absence costs the software industry and is an impediment to addressing a market where women are online in equal numbers to men; directly or indirectly influence 61% of consumer electronics purchases; generate 58% of online dollars; and represent 42% of active gamers. Women avoid careers in software development due to hostile environments, unsustainable pace, diminished purpose, disadvantages in pay, advancement, peers and mentors. Agile values steel practitioners for the hard work of confronting impediments, incrementally nudging an organization towards a more collegial, sustainable, creative and productive workplace so that the organization can repeatedly create software of value to stakeholders and of real use to people. These principles and the emergent properties they instill in organizations fight many of the dysfunctions research indicates contribute to women's flight from and avoidance of software careers. Through iterative cycles of knowledge creation and sharing within companies, across enterprises, into academic institutions and out to the media success within development teams can shift the larger culture. Agile adoption itself is an example of this. The result could be more human workplaces and a more social and engaged view of the software developer that will encourage girls to pursue computer science and help the industry recruit and retain larger numbers of talented women. The presenter is developer, manager and executive who has practiced Agile methods for nine years and eleven years working in Women run businesses in the Media industry in New York City.

Speakers

Thursday August 16, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am
Austin 4-6

9:00am

Fixing Broke(n) Governments Through Serious Games: Luke Hohmann
It’s no secret. We’re broke. Local, state and federal governments around the world are all facing budget shortfalls, spending cuts and reduced services. All of us — ordinary citizens, elected officials, civic and community leaders — know that we must make dramatic changes to solve these crises, and yet governments remain gridlocked. How do we move beyond this impasse? How do we create an approach to budgeting that is both participatory and scalable? The answer lies in the serious games pioneered by the Agile Community. In this interactive lecture, participants will learn to conduct in-person and online games built specifically for resolving multi-dimensional budget problems. These games are based on games that have been played for years in the Agile Community. In this session, however, we'll demonstrate that by challenging our own definitions of leadership, we can demonstrate that practices common in many Agile teams can have a massive impact. We will detail the Budget Games played in San Jose, CA, on Jan. 29, 2011 and Jan 21, 2011. In both sessions more than 100 community leaders collaboratively re-crafted the city’s proposed budget. Because the games, which were graciously facilitated pro-bono by many members of the Agile Community, generated actionable consensus, San Jose officials were able to act on the game’s results with more confidence than traditional polling. In the workshop, participants will learn how to run a budget game in their own community and help refine both the in-person and online game prototypes. Brief overview of our process and results from January 2011 (the Jan 2012 games have not been completed): 1. The San Jose Mayor’s office created a list of 18 funding proposals that community leaders could purchase using the basic game structure of the Innovation Game® _Buy a Feature_. The total cost of these items was $14,000,000. The list of items that we used in this game can be found here: [funding proposals](http://innovationgames.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/fundingproposals.pdf). 2. Community leaders organized into groups of between 7 and 9 players, with 8 players / game as the most common configuration. Each player was given $200,000 to purchase items they wanted. This was a very constrained game, and Community leaders quickly determined that they couldn’t buy much. 3. The Mayor’s office created a second list of budget cuts that the Community leaders could select through unanimous agreement to get more money. This list of potential budget cuts we used in this game can be found here: [reduction proposals](http://innovationgames.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/reductionproposals.pdf). 4. The pricing and structure of items on either list cannot be adjusted (this is a standard rule for _Buy a Feature_ games). 5. One Innovation Games® Trained Facilitator and One Innovation Games® Trained Observer managed each group to minimize researcher bias and record key aspects of the negotiations. 6. The game was played for 90 minutes. 7. There was no requirement that any items were purchased or cut. The community leaders were in complete control of their virtual money. 8. We prepared a [final report}(http://innovationgames.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/BidsOnly-Raw-Game-Data.pdf) that allowed City leaders to take action. An even more thorough review of the event results can be found [here](http://innovationgames.com/2011/02/san-jose-ca-community-leaders-budget-games-results/).
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/Agile-2012-Presentation-Hohmann.pdf

Speakers


Thursday August 16, 2012 9:00am - 10:30am
Texas 3

11:00am

Demanding Technical Excellence and Professionalism: Robert Martin
The vast majority of software developers have yet to learn the practices and disciplines that constitute professional behavior. That's because those practices have only just recently been defined. The software industry is barely fifty years old. It has taken nearly that long to figure out what software professionalism is. It is only in the last few years that a set of generally accepted software practices have been defined. But now they are here, and it's time for management to demand that professional behavior. In this talk, Robert C. Martin will describe these disciplines, and practices, and will discuss how to raise the professionalism bar in your projects and teams.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Martin

Robert Martin

CleanCoders
Robert Martin (Uncle Bob) (@unclebobmartin) has been a programmer since 1970. He is the Master Craftsman at 8th Light inc, co-founder of the on-line video training company: cleancoders.com , and founder of Uncle Bob Consulting LLC.  He is an acclaimed speaker at conferences worldwide... Read More →


Thursday August 16, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm
Texas C

1:30pm

5 Free Leadership Tools that Improve Agile Results: Pollyanna Pixton
Free? Free? What do you mean, free? What can you, as a leader, do in your organization to improve company performance without spending any money? From experience working with leaders inside organizations such as IBM, Headwaters, and Headstart as well as research into what drives organizational performance, we have uncovered five things leaders can do that will not cost them a penny and, when implemented effectively, will make a positive impact on their top and bottom lines. What are these ‘magic’ activities? Let's take a look. Start with creating a culture of trust. While we can't make people trust each other, leaders can create an environment that fosters trust building. Next, Agile is based on team ownership. However, many leaders struggle with how to help teams take ownership and often make the mistake by taking ownership back from teams.Leaders cannot change or "fix" people. People do what they are passionate about. Leaders who match passion and skills to roles on teams can see improved productivity. Finally, integrity is essential. These tools are all free.
http://submit2012.agilealliance.org/files/session_pdfs/5 Free Things 15-Aug-12.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Pollyanna Pixton

Pollyanna Pixton

President, Accelinnova
Pollyanna Pixton's career focus has been to help develop great leaders who bring collaboration, trust and ownership into their organizations to improve the work environment and increase productivity and innovation.



Thursday August 16, 2012 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Austin 4-6